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How I Made $28,700.06 Blogging in April 2020 (Blog Income Report)


Another month is in the books… for what’s shaping up to be a pretty unprecedented year, with so much change going on across the world.

I’ve found that a lot more of my time lately has been going toward finding ways I can help better support people through initiatives like my blog scholarship program (which I ended up extending to 6 bloggers that I’ve been actively working with almost daily over these past few weeks) and making more time for deeper Q&A with my readers here. I’ve stayed busy creating more free resources and downloadable assets for readers than ever, too. It feels like there’s always more to do, but it’s also been a very positive experience seeing how resilient we are in this challenging time.

These times have reminded me that I have a lot to be grateful for, and that I’ve benefited immensely by investing in myself over the years—growing my blog business into an asset that’s providing a good measure of financial stability. Blog income for April came in at $28,700.06. Traffic increased a sizable amount too, bringing in 337,124 readers and 421,169 unique sessions.

Now, let’s dig into the numbers for April… blog income rose a little bit over the previous month, landing far beyond my forecast range thanks to increased affiliate commissions from my guide about how to start a blog and another month of increased enrollments in my comprehensive blogging course, Built to Blog: How to Get Your First 10,000 Readers and Earn Six-Figures Blogging.

Overall, I generated $28,700.06 in blog income during April of 2020.

Expenses went a little higher this month as I wanted to keep my writers as busy as they wanted to be—which built up my buffer of new content in the pipeline. Profit for April came in at $21,262.60.

The Forecast 🌤: For May, I’m anticipating a pretty decent increase in blog income, expecting to land in the range of $28,000 – $33,000 or possibly higher depending upon the timing of some payouts. Income is likely to keep rising a bit over the coming months as I continue benefiting from traffic gains, spend more time beefing up my existing content and weaving in new affiliate promotions throughout my content. May will go back to being lighter on expenses as I stay somewhat lean with everything going on in the world, and I stay focused mostly on content updates.

Now, on to the details of my April blog income report…

Blog Income in April 2020: $28,700.06

In these monthly reports, I track my total income every month, including each individual source of that income, and associated expenses with running my business. This is the good and the bad.

Next, I break down the traffic to my blog which heavily impacts my income, including what’s performing best and how I’m working to drive in more readers. I also cover how many email subscribers I’m at, the number of new subscribers acquired during the month, and what that growth trajectory looks like.

Finally, I cover updates on any other side projects I’m working on for the month.


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Now, let’s do this.

Blog Income Breakdown for April 2020

Freelance Clients & Sponsorships

$24,533.55

$9,015.00
$251.23
$0.00
$8,235.00
$400.00
$100.63
$0.00
$74.78
$138.70
$53.93
$2,592.57
$143.50
$1,406.65
$234.00
$66.52
$0.00
$0.00
$0.00
$353.71
$0.00
$665.41
$7.00
$559.30
$101.85
$9.83
$50.00
$13.97
$59.97

 

Expenses Breakdown

Web Services: Hosting and Storage

Kinsta
SmartWP Hosting
Dreamhost
Google Drive
Cloudflare

$374.93

$300.00
$30.00
$34.94
$9.99
$0.00

$315.64

$0.00
$99.00
$0.00
$52.99
$10.00
$0.00
$14.99
$16.20
$50.00
$62.47

Professional Services

Freelance Writers
Technical Consultant
Business Insurance
Tax Preparation (CPA)
Blog Scholarships

$5,673.95

$2,968.71
$1,000.00
$87.25
$1,150.00
$467.99

Travel, Office Supplies & Misc

AT&T Service Plan (iPhone)
Internet (Comcast)
Health Insurance
Transaction and Processing Fees

$1,082.93

$115.66
$91.28
$400.42
$475.57

 

Net Profit Breakdown


Now, on to my blog and email-related statistics for April.


2. Blog Stats for April 2020: 337,124 Sessions and 139,941 Total Email Subscribers

Google Analytics Screenshot Blog Income Report April 2020 Ryan Robinson

April saw a pretty sizable boost in traffic over March, as almost all of my key organic search rankings climbed a bit higher, suggesting a pretty positive outlook for May as well. Still, if there’s any constant I’ve come to expect—it’s that change and volatility are still the new normal in today’s digital environment, so diversification is key 🙂

Again this month, a very positive signal I’m continuing to see… is that almost all of my long-form blogging-related content that I’ve worked extremely hard to publish this past year are still continuing to climb higher up the first page of search results for their target keyword phrases (suggesting there’s a lot of strong potential for growth throughout this year).

The overarching theme I’ve learned though, is that this is truly a long game… and I’m investing much more than ever before into a more strategic content roadmap that should lead to stronger future performance around more profitable content (with less dependance on traffic).

My blog is also now driving a higher volume of traffic to a much greater number of different articles (and revenue sources) than this time last year. During April of last year, I was actually getting more overall site traffic, but it was mostly to about ~5 key articles that I began relying very heavily on for performance. After seeing some volatility with those search rankings, I started publishing new content like crazy and working very hard to spread my traffic out amongst a much greater number of articles… and I’m now starting to see similar levels of traffic again, but this time to more like ~15 to 20 different articles (which translates into more diverse revenue sources too).

I was up in Sessions from March by 20.37% as traffic climbed pretty significantly. Pageviews rose to 558,072.

Overall, I’m down 16.68% in traffic year-over-year compared to April of 2019, which was one of my best months ever in terms of traffic. Still, my most read articles continue to deliver traffic from organic search—and my newest content is consistently climbing in organic search rankings as well. I’m in a pretty positive position considering my key priorities and intense focus I have on increased revenue from my existing traffic.

Here are my top 15 most trafficked posts from April, ranked in descending order of which drove the most readers:

With April seeing traffic rise pretty dramatically, readers to my 25,000+ word guide, How to Start a Blog and Make Money increased pretty significantly too—which still holds rankings in organic search for competitive terms like how to start a bloghow to blog and such.

And as per usual, when more readers land on that guide… more are joining my free course, How to Build a Blog in 7 Days and are offered an opportunity to join my more comprehensive paid Built to Blog course that’ll help them level up their blogging journey even more.

Also in April, I published two new long-form articles for my growing audience of bloggers:

The majority of my “content time” last month again went to updating and expanding my biggest, most important guides—along with still fixing the formatting of some pages (as a side effect of my now finished blog redesign).

My plan is to keep publishing a steady stream of in-depth, highly actionable content for bloggers this month—and moving forward into the future.

This is all with the continued long-term goal of signaling to Google that my site is primarily about blogging and I’m expecting that to keep delivering more readers looking for tactical blogging advice over the long haul… and I have to remind myself that this is a long-term investment 💪

2. Email Subscribers.

ConvertKit Screenshot (Email Subscriber) April 2020 Ryan Robinson Blog Income Report

I’ve used ConvertKit to manage my email subscriber community and deliver my emails for several years now and I absolutely love the product.

April saw the addition of 3,472 subscribers to my community with my total email list growing to 139,941 subscribers.

This was a positive turnaround in subscriber growth compared to the past couple of months, with a few key articles getting more traffic than than they’d seen in the beginning of the year (lots of little Google algorithm updates are still happening right now, which sends me fluctuations in organic traffic).

On top of that, I’m also still seeing the downstream effects of a new email subscriber verification tool I started using, called DeBounce—which guarantees only real, authentic email addresses are used to sign up for my list… thereby increasing the quality of my email subscribers and ensuring that no fake, spam or questionable email addresses are used to sign up for my community. That tool alone has already caught (and stopped) hundreds of suspicious email addresses from joining my list.

Still, many of my new subscribers came from my influx of blogging-related content and free downloads—which is my ultimate goal to keep focused on, as that’s the niche I’m doubling down on serving.

Much of my new subscriber growth continues to be fueled by my free course, Build a Blog in 7 Days which is well-optimized for both affiliate revenue—and for offering my more advanced paid course (Built to Blog).

3. Blog Scholarship Update

Working with the 6 people I chose to support with my blog scholarship program has been incredible so far, with a few already seeing some meaningful results in just 2 weeks of working together! And because this mentorship program & group community has been going so well, I want to share regular updates with everyone here, each month.

Here’s a quick snapshot from the Slack group we have together, showing some of the results Heather (of the sourdough baking blog, Leavenly) has already seen from starting to promote her content on Pinterest (something we talked about in our first 1-on-1 call together). Pinterest had never been on Heather’s radar as a promotional channel for her blog—and one of my first recommendations was that we change that!

“We only started pinning about two weeks ago. One of our pins started to take off and I saw traffic to the blog triple overnight. As a result, my daily sign-ups more than doubled and it looks like the traffic is holding steady.”

Slack Community Screenshot (Blog Scholarship Peeps)

On top of Heather’s quick win with Pinterest already, we’re also working to update several of her key articles, plan out a strategic content roadmap for the coming months—and she’s beginning to pitch guest posts to several blogs in her niche this week too. Heather’s guide about how to make sourdough bread is seriously epic, so that’s going to be a major focus to get more traffic to this year.

And plenty of other wins are also happening in the group already…

  • Pradip (of the product management blog, The Product Angle), was recently asked to write a guest blog post for a prominent publication/community in his niche—and we’ve been strategizing on exactly how he can scale up his guest blogging efforts while keeping pace with the rest of his blog’s priorities. One of the guides we’ll be working to rank higher on Pradip’s site is his tutorial about building practical negotiation skills (for product people).

Slack Pradip Win

  • Corey, who runs the productivity blog Quickbooost, is also focusing 100% of his efforts this month on guest blogging to build up his blog’s domain authority. We set activity goals—so he’ll be identifying 10 prospective blogs & publications (with high authority) and sending them an email pitch we’re crafting together, to see how many guest posts he can land in just one month. Stay tuned for an update on his campaign! Here’s one of Corey’s most epic (updated) article about how to be productive.
  • Dina, the insanely talented calligrapher behind Dina Calligraphy is planning out the details of migrating her blog from Squarespace over to WordPress, so that she can (soon) start scaling up her own content publishing efforts. We’re also strategizing on an influencer and blogger outreach campaign that’ll serve as a foundation for building relationships with several of the top calligraphers, hand lettering artists and designers in her niche. From there, we’ve got a plan for activating those relationships into win-win content promotion opportunities. One of the articles we’ll be promoting is her guide about how to write a calligraphy business plan.
  • Kyle, one half of the team behind Nimble Bar, where they’ve built a pretty impressive online bartender training business already, is working hard on a few key long-form content updates we identified—which should help their site pretty quickly climb the organic search rankings for a few of their most crucial keyword phrases. We’re simultaneously starting to do some outreach to a small handful of high authority blogs with either a carefully curated guest post pitch or a more PR-driven angle based on their quick success transitioning their business to being primarily online this past year. We’ll be working hard to rank his guide about how to become a bartender higher in organic search, thus bringing in more targeted readers over the coming months.
  • Hannah and her husband Ned over at The Making Life, have already experimented with a pretty fruitful strategy that combines their written blog posts with longer-form videos on their YouTube channel, so we’re identifying a handful of key articles to update (make more in-depth from a writing perspective) and also create video content to live side-by-side with those articles. We’ve also started to look at potential blogs in the maker/crafting/DIY niche that they can pitch on guest posting, and we’ll be sending some of those pitches soon! Check out her recent article on how to plant a vegetable garden.

This has seriously been some of the most rewarding work I’ve done recently, and I’m super grateful to be pitching in (even in just a small way) to the growth of a few hard-working bloggers. Stay tuned for more updates on how everyone’s doing over the coming months!

And as a quick aside, I’ve been getting more into Scrabble these days… so I started tinkering on a new side project with my friend, Andy (who runs SmartWP with me). It’s called Word Finder Pro and we’re hoping to eventually make the most robust Scrabble word finder tool on the Internet.

That’s it for my April blog income report.

I’m still on a break from recording new podcast episodes as my attention goes primarily to producing more standout written content (along with auditing & updating my existing content library) and eventually into more videos for my YouTube channel. Once the time is right though, my goal is to bring the podcast back with a new focus and format around providing the most actionable blogging advice out there. Stay tuned for updates on that!

As we covered at the beginning of this report, I’m predicting blog income to rise a bit during May, landing between $28,000 – $33,000 as I experience the downstream benefits of traffic increases positively impacting my revenue as well. My main focus still remains on publishing more in-depth blogging content that’ll pay off over the course of the coming months (and years).

If you’re looking for some additional reading to help grow your own blog, I’m always updating my ultimate guide to building and scaling a profitable blog right here that I’d love for you to read 😊

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Commanding a knowledge of all the key blogging terms is essential if you want to grow a profitable blog.

And because it took me years to fully master all of the blogging terms out there in the wild, I’ve compiled this ultimate glossary of key blogging terms you’ll want to know in order to become a more successful blogger this year.

Recent blogging statistics highlight that there will be approximately 31.7 million bloggers by the end of 2020 (in the US alone). Even more mind-boggling is the fact that these bloggers are responsible for publishing nearly 70 Million blog posts each and every month. Blogging has a rich history, and it’s not going anywhere. In fact, it’s only getting more competitive.

Seeing that you’re competing with personal bloggers, affiliate marketers, professional bloggers, media bloggers, microbloggers and reverse bloggers (you might want to look that one up in this list of blogging terms below), you’re going to need all the help you can get.

Since 71% of WordPress blogs are written in English, with Spanish at 4.7% (2nd), and Indonesian at 2.4% (3rd), we’ll be sticking to blogging terms in the English language for now. If you have some blogging terms to share—that I may have missed in this glossary—please share with us in the comments below!

Once you’ve developed a command of the blogging terms you’ll need to know and are ready to build a profitable blog—head over to my ultimate guide to starting a blog.

Want to Start Your Blog (the Right Way)?

Check out my ultimate guide How to Start a Blog (on the Side).


Now without further delay, let’s dive into my ultimate list of all the top blogging terms you’ll need to know in order to blog smarter this year.

230+ Blogging Terms You Need to Know in 2020 (Blogging Glossary)

We’ll be going through this list of blogging terms in alphabetical order, so you can always jump straight down to the letter you’re searching for.

A  —  Blogging Terms

First up, key blogging terms that begin with the letter A.

1. AdSense

Google ads can run on your blog and turn your blog into a money-making machine. The program (Google AdSense) has been designed for bloggers and website publishers who are looking for opportunities to display targeted text, image or video ads on their web pages—to earn money when a visitor clicks on those ads. Advertisers pay Google either by the click (PPC) or impression (CPM) and Google shares a percentage of that revenue with the AdSense publishers.

Google AdSense Blogging Terms to Know This Year

This image above is what an AdSense ad looks like. You can get started with installing AdSense on your blog right here.

2. A/B Testing

Testing two versions of the content you create, in order to find the perfect match for specific audiences. A/B testing for bloggers is most often applied to testing out different email subject lines within an email marketing tool like ConvertKit or AWeber—or when it comes to sampling which blog post headlines perform better in terms of getting more clicks from organic search traffic.

3. Above-the-Fold

The content of a blog or webpage which appears up top before you need to scroll down.

4. Affiliate

An affiliate is a blogger who uses affiliate marketing, or is in a referral program or revenue sharing program that compensates you in return for recommending a product, service or tool to your readers. Affiliate marketers earn commissions by promoting the products of others on their blog (via affiliate programs). Learn more about affiliate marketing in my ultimate guide about how to make money blogging.

5. Autocasting

An automated form of podcasting which allows bloggers to generate audio versions of their text blog posts directly from their RSS feeds.

6. Audioblog

A blog where the posts consist mainly of voice recordings or audio clips.

7. Avatar

A graphic picture or thumbnail image used to represent a blogger online. Here’s my avatar that appears at the bottom of each post on my blog:

Blogging Terms to Understand Avatar

8. Atom

An automatic feed format that’s sometimes used as an alternative to RSS feeds.

9. Analytics

The information and data that’s gathered to evaluate the performance of your blog and better understand who your readers are, what they’re doing and how you can better serve them. The leader in website analytics (Google Marketing Platform) is powered by data from Google Analytics, which allows bloggers to measure how much traffic their blog is getting and where those readers are coming from, along with other essentials like your advertising ROI from any Google ad spend.

10. Anonoblog

A blog that’s maintained by an anonymous author. Also known as faux or ghost blog.

11. Alexa Rank

The Alexa Rank is the measurement of a website’s popularity on the Internet. The rank is calculated with the help of a proprietary methodology that combines a blog’s estimated traffic along with visitor engagement for the past three months. Alexa refers to the data retrieved from multiple browsers as its ‘Global Traffic Panel’ and corrects biases with the help of an algorithm to get to an accurate Alexa Rank. Unlike other scoring systems, having a lower Alexa Rank is actually better, as it indicates your overall rank amongst the websites of the world.

Alexa Rank Homepage Screenshot (Blogging Terms Glossary)

12. Anchor Text

The text that’s used within a clickable hyperlink. For example, the anchor text of this hyperlink: how to name a blog is “how to name a blog.”

13. Alt Text

Alt text, or alternative text, is the word or phrase that’s used to tell readers of a blog (and more importantly, search engines) the nature of an image on the page.

Alt Text Blogging Term Screenshot

14. Astroturfing (in SEO)

The act of deceptively paying people to act like your customers (or an unbiased party) in order to promote your brand or blog to others. Yeah, not a smart thing to do.

15. Automate

The process of automating a task online, so that it’s controlled by a machine or WordPress plugin, rather than a manual task done by a person.

B  —  Blogging Terms

Now, onto blogging terms that start with the letter B.

16. Biblioblogosphere

A humorous reference that is given to the niche, librarian blogging.

17. Blaudience

A blog’s audience—regular readers of a blog.

18. Blath

A mashup of the words “blog” and “math,” used to describe math-related blogs.

19. Blawg

A blog that focuses on law, usually written by a lawyer (hopefully), professor or law student.

20. Bleg

A combination of the words “blog” and “beg.” A blog that requests contributions or information from their readers.

21. B-listless (Blistless)

When a blogger becomes apathetic towards their new content. It’s indicative to what could happen to the email list of a blogger that loses interest.

22. BBloggers

A common hashtag that’s used by beauty bloggers.

23. Blog

A blog is a regularly updated website where new content is frequently published, typically written in an informal or conversational style—often with the goal of attracting readers and achieving some sort of goal, whether community-building or growing a business.

24. Blog Carnival

Those blogs that contain links to other blogs covering a specific topic, typically used by frequent blog contributors of a website.

25. Blog Client (Weblog Client)

Software that’s run on your computer that allows you post new content to your blog via XML-RPC (outdated software in my opinion). Well over 90% of bloggers use a content management system (CMS) like WordPress to visually input your blog content.

26. Bloggernacle

A mashup of the words “blog” and “tabernacle.” Blogs that are written by Mormons for Mormons.

27. Blogversary

The birthday of your blog.

28. Blog Farm

A website built from a group of linked blogs, with the main blog aggregating the total content as the gateway. This “tool” is most often used to try and deceptively boost the authority of a particular website, but is no longer effective in today’s SEO world.

29. Best of Blogs (The BOBs)

This is the world’s largest international blog competition, bestowed by a German broadcaster named Deutsche Welle.

30. Blog Feed

An XML-based file where the monthly hosting software you’re using to get your blog online stores a machine-readable version of the blog post in either an RSS or Atom structured XML format, for it to get syndicated (for further distribution throughout the Internet). For bloggers, the easiest way of adding a feed to a page, is with the use of a feed widget. Check out my list of the best blogging tools for recommendations on the right tool.

31. Blog Hopping

This refers to readers who follow links that are displayed within a blog post, leading them to various blogs and websites onto another.

32. Blog Site

The web location (URL) of your blog.

33. Blog Header

This is the top-most section of your blog post. Usually, this section is used to showcase your blog’s logo, site title and key navigation links.

34. Blog Footer

The very bottom of your blog post. This space is most often used to list site navigation links.

35. Blog Sidebar

The vertical section or column that’s on one side of your blog—usually used to promote things like related content, signing up for your email list or otherwise.

36. Bloglet

A very short blog entry (the length of a line or two max).

37. Blogosphere

A blogging community like what I manage for students in my Built to Blog course—or as an umbrella term to describe all blogs ever written.

Blogging Community Example on Facebook (Built to Blog) Blogging Terms

38. Blogoneer

A combination of the words “blog” and “pioneer” to describe a blogger who blogs with a pioneering (expert) attitude.

39. Blogorrhea

A portmanteau of the words “blog” and “logorrhea” which means being excessively talkative within your blog content.

40. Blogroll

A list of other recommended blogs that are found on the sidebar or footer of a blog.

41. Blogsite

Unlike Blog Site, a blogsite is a website that showcases various blog feeds from a variety of different sources.

42. Blogsnob

A blogger who doesn’t reply to the comments that have been left on their blog.

43. Blogstipation

Similar to writer’s block, this simply means being in a state of mind which makes it difficult to think about fresh blog post ideas to write about.

44. Blogstorm

Also known as a blog swarm, this occurs when there’s a huge amount of activity surrounding a particular blog subject. Also known as the avalanche of engagement created after posting a blog on a controversial subject.

Blogstorming Blogging Terms Explained (Glossary Example)

45. Boreblogging

Writing in-depth about your personal matters. It doesn’t need to be boring though 😉

46. Blogstream

Following the mainstream news and media coverage.

47. Bloll

A combination of “blog” and “troll.” A troll who specializes in trolling bloggers.

48. Bots

Automated accounts that are often used on blogs to leave spam comments (and get backlinks from those comments).

49. Bot Account

A social media account (often on platforms like Twitter or Instagram) that’s set up by an automated process and not a real person—with the goal of falsely boosting follower count or the number of engagements your posts get.

50. Bounce Rate

According to Google, a bounce is a single-page session on your website. In other words, it is the percentage of people who viewed one page before leaving your blog. The bounce rate is a web analytics measure that tracks the behavior of visitors on a website or a page within a website. The bounce rate is one of the most important metrics you can keep an eye on in Google Analytics, because it indicates how engaged your readers are.

Bounce Rate Blogging Terms Explained Screenshot

51. Backlink

A backlink is a link from another website that points to a post (or page) on your blog. A backlink usually takes you from one website to another, that usually has information related to the topic you were reading about—or at the very least related to the anchor text of the hyperlink.

52. Beta Reader

An early test reader of your blog, who gives you feedback on the quality of your content.

53. Black Hat SEO

Frowned upon, discouraged or even illegal search engine optimization tactics used to gain SEO benefits and increase your blog’s rankings in organic search positions.

C  —  Blogging Terms

Alright, now blogging terms that begin with the letter C.

54. Call to Action

Also known as a CTA, that’s put in place by a blogger that wants to prompt readers into taking specific action (that’s ideally relevant to the topic at hand).

For example, here’s a relevant CTA to head over and read my free guide to starting a blog:

Want to Start Your Blog (the Right Way)?

Check out my ultimate guide 5 Steps How to Start a Blog (on the Side).

55. Category

A category or label tag that bloggers use to post based on a specific topic or niche on their blog.

56. Click Bait

Sensational or even misleading headlines that are designed to trick readers into thinking the content contains information that it doesn’t. Usually done to make content highly shareable. Think Buzzfeed headlines.

57. Click-Through Rate

Also known as CTR, this measures the percentage of people who click on an ad or promotion to arrive at your blog. It’s a term most often used to measure the success of an online advertising campaign. The CTR can be used to gauge how well keywords in your ad campaigns are performing. Having a high clickthrough rate does not assure a good conversion rate. CTR depends on various factors, such as channel (search, display, email), industry (B2B, tech), creative type (banners, text) and targeting (broad vs. precise).

58. CAPTCHA

Short for ‘Completely Automated Public Turing Test To Tell Computers and Humans Apart’ this is a challenge-response test that’s commonly used by bloggers and on websites of all kinds to determine if a user who wants to access information is a human or a bot.

CAPTCHA Screenshot Example Blogging Terms Glossary

59. Content Marketing

Creating high quality content that’s designed to attract readers who could potentially become a customer of your business. Content marketing is often used to support your sales funnel, in order to answer key questions & objections, educate prospects, eliminate doubts and provide genuine value in an effort to build meaningful relationships with your potential customers. Check out my guide to developing a smart content marketing strategy here.

60. Content Syndication

Having your blog content posted on another site after it’s been first published on your own blog. Content syndication can be in the form of a simple link, thumbnail, snippet or even a run of your entire blog post (with a link back to your original article on your blog).

61. Content Upgrade

An incentive given to blog readers in exchange for signing up to join your email list. Content upgrades are directly related to the topic discussed in a particular article, and usually take the form of a free course, template, worksheet or other downloadable asset that furthers the education on the topic at hand.

For example, the content upgrade I promote in both my guides about how to write a blog post and how to outline a blog post is my copy/paste blog post template for starting out your own winning blog writing process:

Blog Post Template Screenshot Example in Content Upgrade Blogging Terms

62. Conversion Rate

The percentage of visitors on your blog who converted into completing a particular success metric. An example of a conversion rate could be the percentage of readers who joined your email list after reading a particular blog post—or the effectiveness of your blogger outreach campaign (to lead to new guest blogging opportunities, partnerships or otherwise).

63. Creative Commons

The permission that’s given by photo-sharing sites like Unsplash, Pexels and Shutterstock for the use of their photos.

64. Curated Content

Content that’s been hand-picked.

65. cPanel

A tool offered by all of the best hosting plans and providers, that makes it easier for users to configure the technical settings of their own accounts without needing technical support.

66. Celeblog

A blog that details the lives of celebrities. Similar to a tabloid mag, these blogs often feature embarrassing photos of celebrities taken by the paparazzi.

Cleblog Celebrity Blog Post (Blogging Terms Glossary)

67. Clix

A blogger’s personal circle of online communities.

68. Collaborative blog

Also called a group blog, where multiple bloggers post their thoughts on a particular issue on a single blog.

69. Comment spam

When spambots flood a blog post with fake comments.

70. Comped

Something that’s been given for free to a blogger, usually in exchange for a review or shoutout.

71. Cost Per Click

Also known as CPC, this is a measurement of how much you spend for each click an advertisement of yours receives on an ad platform like Google or Facebook.

72. Cost Per Mille (Mille = Thousand)

Also known as CPM, this is the amount of money you spend for each block of 1,000 impressions one of your advertisements receives on an ad platform.

D  —  Blogging Terms

Now, blogging terms that begin with the letter D.

73. Direct Traffic

The number of people who type in your blog’s URL (address) directly into the search bar, navigating straight to your blog.

74. Domain Name

The web address of your blog (like yourawesomeblog.com) that people type into either the address bar or a Google search in order to find a particular website or article. It’s best to name your blog in a clever way that gives a clue as to what your content topics will cover. If you’re still trying to choose a domain name that’s ideal for your niche, try using one of these top domain name generators or head over to SmartWP’s Name Generator to give it a quick spin.

75. Domain Authority (or Domain Rating)

A metric used by SEO tools like Ahrefs and Moz to measure the authoritativeness of your blog on a scale of 0 to 100. The score of your blog arguably indicates how well your content should rank in the search engine results.

76. Dark Blog

A blog that is not accessible to the general public.

77. Desktop Blogging Client

A blog management tool that can be used offline to edit and post your blog content.

78. Dashboard

The home base area behind-the-scenes of your blog within your CMS (like WordPress or another similar platform) where you can navigate around to doing tasks like uploading blog content, installing plugins, making visual changes to your pages and otherwise.

79. Deep Linking

Blogs that link to various other relevant pages on a blog post or website, with the intention of encouraging readers to spend more time on your blog.

E  —  Blogging Terms

Up next, blogging terms that begin with the letter E.

80. Engagement

The amount of comments, likes or retweets your blog posts can generate.

81. Editorial Calendar

This is a smart blogging tool that’s used by many bloggers (like me) to sketch a blog post outline and fully explain the blog post ideas I’ll be writing about in the future. It also helps me organize my writing process and track performance of content over time. Editorial calendars are usually maintained on a monthly or quarterly basis.

82. Event Blogging

Blogging on upcoming events for which bloggers and marketers also often purchase EMDs (Exact Match Domains) for those upcoming events.

Blogging Events for Bloggers to Meet

83. Evergreen Content

Blog posts or other digital content that’s usually very thorough & in-depth, written with the intention of remaining relevant for years to come.

F  —  Blogging Terms

On to the next! Blogging terms that begin with the letter F.

84. Followers

Those who subscribe to your blog or follow your accounts on social media platforms like Twitter or Instagram.

85. Follow/Unfollow

The trick of following social media accounts in order to entice them into following your account back—only for you to soon unfollow the ones that didn’t follow you back, thus boosting your follower count and making it appear that you have more engagement than you actually do.

86. Fisking

A point-by-point refutation of a blog entry that’s often witty and sarcastic.

87. Flog

A mashup of the words “fake” and “blog.” Most often used to describe either an entire blog or article that’s been ghostwritten by someone other than the claimed author.

88. Favicon

The image displayed for a website within your browser tab.

Favicon Screenshot Example on Blogging Terms Glossary

89. Flame War

Attacks or personal arguments that are made in the comment section of a blog. These can get nasty quick.

90. Farticle

Get your head out of the gutter. This term is slang to describe a fake news article, or an advertorial that’s positioned to look at an unbiased news story or product review.

91. FTP

Stands for File Transfer Protocol, which is a client-server protocol used for the transfer of files. This is a popular way of downloading or uploading files from or onto a server.

G  —  Blogging Terms

Up next, we’ve got the key blogging terms that start with the letter G.

92. Gravatar

The image that follows you from blog to blog (usually when you post a comment or write a guest blog post), appearing beside your name. You can set your Gravatar here.

93. Guest Post

Guest blogging is when you write a blog post or article for another person’s blog with the goal of attracting some of their readers back to your own blog (and for increasing the authority of your website in the eyes of search engines).

94. Glog

A mashup of the words “gonzo” and “blog” which is a first-person recording of a particular activity.

95. GBCW

Good Bye Cruel World. This term is often used by someone who decides to discontinue their blog. Avoid these blogging mistakes and you’ll steer clear of needing to GBCW your blog anytime soon.

96. Gulog

A distasteful combination of the words “gulag” and “blog” that’s often used to describe a depressing blog post.

H  —  Blogging Terms

97. H1, H2, H3 Tags

Heading tags that denote different size headings in a blog post or on a particular page. The H1 tag should contain your main keyword phrase and should only be used once on a page. The H2 tag is a subheading and should contain similar keywords to the H1 tag, but can be used to break up major sections of your content.

The H3 tag is the subheading of the H2 tag and should be used to denote sections of content within your larger H2 sections. When it comes to Heading tags, H1 is the most important while H3 (and so on) gets less and less attention from search engines.

H Title Tags Screenshot Example in Blogging Terms Glossary

98. Hosting Service

The company that hosts your blog online and makes it visible on the Internet. Here are my recommendations for the best monthly hosting plans you should consider—and if you’re on a tighter budget, consider these cheap hosting plans or opt for experimenting with a free hosting plan instead.

99. HEX Code

Short for hexadecimal. This term is used to denote a specific color code for HTML coding. For example, the HEX code for this red is #eb4034. If you’re looking for a color picker too, Google has their own HEX color picker right here.

Hex Code Example (Screenshot) for Blogging Terms

100. Hyperlink

A link (usually a text link) from one blog that directs readers to another website.

101. HARO

A service called Help A Reporter Out that’s used to connect online publishers and journalists with experts who can answer questions and contribute to their articles.

102. Hits

The number of users that visit (hit) your blog within a given period.

103. HT

An acronym for “heard through” or “hat tip” that serves as an acknowledgment to the source by a blogger who found something noteworthy.

104. Hyper-Local

Content that relates to a small audience or community.

I  —  Blogging Terms

Now, blogging terms that begin with the letter I.

105. Influencer

An influencer is someone with a large following who can be partnered with by marketers and brands to promote their business. The goal of many bloggers is to build up a sizable following and be considered an influencer—which is one proven way to make money blogging.

106. IRL

Stands for ‘In Real Life’ and is used by bloggers to talk about their life when they’re not blogging.

107. Internal Link

A link that connects a snippet of text within one blog post to your other blog posts on the same site. Internal links are used to send readers over to relevant other articles and to more clearly connect your content for SEO benefits.

108. Infographic

A graphic visual that’s used to break down complex information into easy to digest visual content. Check out my infographics about how to start a blog and about how to write a blog post.

109. Internet Water Army

A group of ghostwriters also called “paid posters” who are paid to post comments on particular content with the purpose to spread disinformation. (Mostly a term used in China).

110. Internet Activism

The use of social media, email, blogs and podcasts for various forms of activism.

K  —  Blogging Terms

Now, blogging terms that start with the letter K.

111. Keyword

A targeted word that’s used to best describe the contents of a blog post or website. Doing intelligent keyword research and incorporating your target keywords in your content is important to creating successful blog posts, because it gives Google clear information about the nature of your article. Without using proper keywords, Google won’t know how to index your articles, which will make it harder for your blog to rank in organic search results.

Blogging Terms Glossary Keyword Definition

112. Keyword Research

Keyword research is the process of (ideally) finding untapped, high-volume keywords that your readers search for on Google. A clever keyword research strategy is to target keywords within your blog’s competitive power—the maximum keyword competition your site is likely to rank for. You can increase your chances of finding the best keywords by using a combination of various tools like Google Keyword Planner, Ahrefs Keywords Explorer, Twinword Ideas or Moz Keyword Explorer.

113. Keyword Stuffing

The act of placing too many of the same keywords within a single post or page—in an attempt to game search engines and rank higher. (Don’t do it).

114. Koufax

An annual quasi-Liberal weblog award.

115. K-log

Knowledge log posted on the company intranet for sharing of company knowledge.

L  —  Blogging Terms

Up next, blogging terms that start with the letter L.

116. Link Bait

Content that’s created in order to gain attention so that other blogs or publications want to link to and share the content.

117. Link Exchange

Whenever two (or more) bloggers place a link to each other’s blog post (or homepage) in order to increase their number of inbound links. Beware though, this practice is expressly discouraged by Google as a link scheme and I highly recommend not doing it, as this qualifies as black-hat (shady) SEO.

118. Listicle

A term used to describe a list-based blog post that takes the form of a piece like this one you’re reading right now… “230+ Blogging Terms Your Need to Know This Year.”

119. Lazy Web

A suggestion sent out to a community to get someone else to do the work.

120. Link Love

Linking to a blog you like because it regularly posts useful information.

121. Log in, Blog To, Log Out

This is a catchphrase that’s used to describe the blogger’s lifestyle.

122. Linkroll

A list of relevant links with brief descriptions in the sidebar of a blog.

123. LBloggers

A commonly used hashtag for Lifestyle Bloggers.

124. Lead Magnet

An incentive that’s offered by a blogger, in order to encourage readers to subscribe and join their email list. It’s synonymous with the blogging term content upgrade, which we covered earlier.

125. Link Building

Artificially increasing your SEO authority by getting other content creators to link to your blog or individual articles. Also considered a link scheme by Google, I recommend steering clear and focusing much more on creating high quality content that can better serve readers than the competition.

126. Link Party

Where bloggers go to show their blog posts in an online forum, by leaving links to their content.

127. Long-Form Content

Any blog post that’s has a longer word count than 1,000 words. I’m a major advocate of using long-form content to attract (and retain) readers, so take a look at my best content to see how I execute on a long-form content strategy.

128. Long-Tail Keywords

Long-tail keywords are keyword phrases that usually comprised of 3, 4 or more words and are very specific to a narrow topic. These keywords are beneficial to blog about, because they’re usually much less competitive to rank for, and you’ll also be bringing highly targeted readers to your blog—albeit a lower volume of them.

Long-Tail Keywords Blogging Terms Glossary

129. Litblog

Any blog post that focuses specifically on literature.

M  —  Blogging Terms

Blogging terms that begin with the letter M.

130. Media Kit

A media kit contains relevant statistics about your blog & audience, that can be used to pitch potential sponsors on why they should pay to reach your audience.

131. Meta Description

The description (HTML tag) that’s used to describe the content of a blog post or page to search engines. See here:

Meta Description and Tags Example Screenshot

132. Microblog

Where the blogger makes frequent short posts.

133. Monetization

The ways in which bloggers decide to make money blogging. There are several ways in which you can monetize your blog including through affiliate programs, advertising networks, sponsorships, the sale of digital products, physical products, offering your services and more.

134. Milblog

A combination of the words “military” and “blog” used to describe blogs that have been written by members of any branch of the military (Army, Navy, Air Force, Marines, etc).

135. Moblog

A blend of the words “mobile” and “blog” featuring blog posts that are sent mainly by mobile phone via text messages.

136. Momosphere

A term used to describe blogs that are written by mothers.

137. Multi-blog

Creating and maintaining multiple blogs at a time.

138. Multi-blogger

A blogger that has multiple blogs running simultaneously.

139. Mobile-Optimized

A blog that’s been tweaked to be viewed on handheld devices with a great user experience. If you choose the right right WordPress theme to power your blog, it’ll come mobile-optimized (responsive) out of the box.

N  —  Blogging Terms

Up next, blogging terms that begin with the letter N.

140. Niche

A blog niche is the specific category of topics you’ve decided to blog about within a particular industry.

141. Natural Blogarithm

A combination of the words “natural logarithm” and “blog” used to describe the vibe of the blogging community.

142. Newsletter

An email-based delivery of content that’s sent out periodically to the subscribers of a blog. You can read more about how to build your email newsletter in my top (free) blogging books.

O  —  Blogging Terms

Now, blogging terms that start with the letter O.

143. Organic Growth

An overall increase of blog traffic that occurs over time as you work to publish quality content, spread the word and bring more readers into your community.

144. Organic Search Results (OSR)

The blog posts on your site that reach rankings for their respective keyword phrases on Google’s search engine result pages.

145. Off-Page/On-Page SEO

Search Engine Optimization that’s done to generate more awareness for your blog. Off-page SEO focused on promoting your content through activities like sharing on social media, while on-page SEO is all about optimizing the individual posts & pages of your blog to be friendly in the eyes of search engines.

146. Opt-in

An incentive (like a content upgrade or lead magnet) that’s offered to readers who opt-in to receiving email updates about your blog.

P  —  Blogging Terms

Alright, here are the key blogging terms that begin with the letter P.

147. Page

A static page on a blog or website that does not update automatically. Pages are different than blog posts in that they’re not added to your RSS feed when a new one is published.

148. Page Rank

Google’s algorithm used to measure the authority of a blog post or particular website in general.

149. Page Views

The number of people who view a particular blog post in a given timeframe.

150. Pain Point

The specific problems faced by readers, that can ideally be solved by the blogger.

151. Parent Theme

The overarching WordPress theme used to control the visual look of your blog.

152. PPC

Pay Per Click is a form of advertising where bloggers pay for each click their advertisement receives.

153. Permalink

The unique URL of the blog post that you publish. Permalinks should rarely ever be changed.

154. Plugin

Plugins are software snippets that add more functions or features to your blog—most commonly offered by private developers who make plugins for WordPress.

155. Padding

The putting together of several mini blog posts to get your blog ready to roll out.

156. PENUS

Cool it. This term stands for ‘Potentially Exciting News Under Scrutiny’ which is used when a blogger needs to share something cool and informative with the blogosphere.

Potentially Exciting News Blogging Terms Glossary

157. Photoblog

A blog that contains mostly photos and images, usually run by a photographer.

158. Placeblog

Used with a hyper-local scope to focus on local people and events.

159. Plog

A blog that regularly posts about political subject matter.

160. Pillar Content

Content that’s created to be extremely informative, usually long-form and has long-term appeal to readers. My ultimate guide about how to start a blog is a great example of this.

Pillar Content Blogging Terms Glossary

R  —  Blogging Terms

Up next, blogging terms that begin with the letter R.

161. Reciprocal Link

A link between two different blogs. If done between blogs that you own, this tends to be a safe practice. However, if you’re doing it with the goal of inflating your own blog’s SEO rankings, then it’s considered a link scheme that you should not take part in.

162. Referral Traffic

The readers who visit your blog after following a link to your content from another blog or website.

163. Rich Answer

Google’s quick result answers to your search engine queries.

164. ROI (Return on Investment)

Your return on investment based on the money you’ve spend on a particular ad campaign within a given window of time.

165. RSS Feed

Short for ‘Really Simple Syndication’ is used by some people to subscribe to a blog. This method of blog subscription used to be more popular, though. In an RSS feed, all your favorite online content is curated and gathered in a single place for you to view.

166. RSS Aggregator

Software that’s used by a blogger to read their RSS feeds, also known as a feedreader.

RSS Aggregator Screenshot Example

167. Re-Blog

The reposting of a previous blog, usually with updated and refreshed information to make it more relevant.

168. Reverse Blogging

This is when you pitch an influencer to create content for your blog, which you then ultimately publish under the influencer’s name as a guest post on your blog.

169. Rel=Canonical

The rel=canonical tag, also known as “canonical link” is an HTML element that helps webmasters prevent duplicate content.

S  —  Blogging Terms

Now we’ve got blogging terms that start with the letter S.

170. Split Testing

Synonymous with A/B testing, a split test is done to see which version of a headline, page or other specific page element does a better job at converting more of your readers.

Split Testing Blogging Terms Glossary Definition

171. SERP

Short for Search Engine Results Page, which is usually referenced in the context of how your blog is performing in organic search results.

172. Sponsored Post

A blog post that’s been paid for by advertisers or brands to promote their product or service.

173. Subscriber

A person who’s signed up for your email newsletter and wants to be updated when a new blog post is published.

174. Scribosphere

A mashup of the words “scribe” and blogosphere” used to describe all blogs that are written by professional and aspiring screenwriters.

175. SHART

Again, not what you’re probably thinking… This is an acronym of ‘Stubborn, Hostile and Resentful Troll’. A blog that receives many negative comments from a specific troll is said to be sharted. Also refers to bloggers who post fake comments on their own blog to gain sympathy.

SHART Blogging Terms Dictionary Entry

176. Shocklog

A blog that posts shocking content to encourage heated discussions on a particular subject.

177. Splog

The term used to describe a spam blog, made popular by Mark Cuban.

178. Spam Blog Post

An individual blog post that’s composed of spam content or used to solely to promote shady products.

179. Slashdotted

When larger websites send a tremendous amount of traffic towards smaller blogs via linking to their content. (This is a good thing 🙂)

180. Storyblog

A blog that’s used primarily as a destination to publish short stories.

181. Svithe

A spiritually themed blog.

182. SAHM

Shorthand acronym for Stay at Home Mom.

183. Self-Hosted blog

When the blogger owns both their blog content and their domain name. My blog is self-hosted on WordPress, and if you choose to start a blog (the right way), you’ll end up with a self-hosted blog. The trade off is that you’ll need to pay for your own hosting plan in order to keep your blog live on the Internet—but there are also free blogging platforms available if you want to test out blogging.

184. Semantic Search

Search terms that are used to understand user-intent.

185. SEO (Search Engine Optimization)

SEO stands for Search Engine Optimization, which is a process used to improve your blog’s rankings in search engine result pages.

186. Sitemap

A list of the pages on your entire blog. Specifically used by Googlebot, a sitemap (XML sitemap) is a file that is not visible to the readers of your blog, unless specifically searched for. It’s used by Googlebot to crawl the pages of your blog and determine what should be included in their search results.

XML Sitemap Example for Blogging Terms Glossary

187. Skyscraper Technique

The skyscraper technique is a tactic that’s used by bloggers to analyze all the existing content for a particular keyword phrase—and then come up with more creative & useful ways to better answer those reader queries with content that’s significantly more valuable.

188. Stop Words

Words that are used in the slug that can harm your SEO-effectiveness. Some stop words to avoid including in your permalinks include: a, the, at, as, of, and, for, to and so on.

189. Slug

The portion of a permalink (URL) starting after .com/.

190. Social Media Engagement

Engaging with your target readers on the social media platforms they frequent.

191. Social Proof

A psychological phenomenon where people assume that a blog post is more popular (or more accurate) based on the number of social shares, comments or other engagement the article appears to have.

192. Social Search

When people search for information on social platforms (like Twitter, Instagram, Facebook and LinkedIn) that mainly searches for user-generated content to find information.

193. Spam

Most commonly referred to when speaking about spam emails that arrive, often promoting scam offers.

194. Sockpuppet

An online identity created for deception. Also used to circumvent a block or ban on an individual’s original email or social media account.

T  —  Blogging Terms

Next, blogging terms that start with the letter T.

195. Tag

Tags are words that are used to categorize & classify a blog post based on the overarching themes it covers, behind the scenes in your CMS.

196. Tagline

The slogan used by blog owners to describe the purpose of their site. My tagline is, Authentic blogging advice.

197. Tag Cloud

Used by bloggers to list all of the tags and keywords that have been used across their sites.

198. Text Link Ads

Advertisements consisting of text that is hyperlinked to a page the sponsor is paying you to promote.

199. Traffic

The number of visitors a blog receives within a given time period. Here’s my guide about how to drive traffic to your blog.

200. Troll

Someone who leaves a negative comments on your blog post, just for fun or to incite a reaction out of you

201. Template (WordPress)

A page template is the coding framework that’s used to organize and publish information on a page of your blog.

202. Theme (WordPress)

The WordPress theme is comprised of the CSS code that controls the visual appearance of your blog.

OptimizePress WordPress Theme for Serious Bloggers

203. Trackback

A system that’s used by bloggers to be notified by (or send notifications to) others who have either linked to their blogs.

204. Target Reader

The target reader or target audience, describes the demographic and psychographic beliefs of who a blogger wants to attract with the content they create.

205. Tailwind

A tool that’s used by bloggers to schedule their Pinterest and Instagram posts.

206. Thin Content

A blog post or page that offers no real value in terms of information and relevancy, thus standing little chance of ever ranking in organic search results.

U  —  Blogging Terms

Next up, blogging terms that begin with the letter U.

207. Unique Visitor

An individual, single visitor of your blog (who may have multiple sessions or could view many pages in one session).

208. User Intent

The goal of a searcher when typing in a particular set of keywords or search queries.

209. UGC

An acronym for User Generated Content, used to describe the content that’s created by visitors of a blog (like comments, guest articles, forum posts or other contributions).

V  —  Blogging Terms

Now, blogging terms beginning with the letter V.

210. Viral

Content like videos, memes or blog posts that get extremely popular in a very short timeframe, but this fame is often short-lived.

Viral Definition Blogging Terms

211. Vlog

A video blog that publishes content primarily in video format.

212. Vlogger

Somebody who manages a video blog (and often YouTube channel).

213. Virtual Assistance (VA)

A virtual assistant is someone who (often) helps bloggers with administrative tasks, usually remotely.

214. Vorage

Like foraging, this is when bloggers share interesting video content online by voraging through new and obscure websites.

W  —  Blogging Terms

Now, blogging terms starting with the letter W.

215. WAHM

Short for Work at Home Mom, which make up a lot of the blogging community.

216. Webinar

Typically a live video seminar or workshop that’s conducted online using tools like Zoom or Google Hangouts.

217. White Hat SEO

Search Engine Optimization strategies that are legal, encouraged and not penalized by Google.

218. Widgets

Blogging tools that are provided out of the box by WordPress and can add functionality to the sidebar, header or footer menu of your blog.

219. WYSIWYG

Short for What You See Is What You Get. Most great WordPress themes today function this way, which allows bloggers to post new content and publish pages without writing any code, known as posting in WYSIWYG mode.

220. Web Keynoting

To have the text in a blog post dictated by a voice professional.

221. Weborexic

A term used to describe small ‘width-wise’ layouts of a blog.

222. WordPress

A free blogging platform that allows users to create their own customized blogs and websites for free. It’s the leading platform used by the vast majority of bloggers around the world.

223. Warblog

A blog that is devoted toward covering news about ongoing wars.

224. Weblog

The long-form name that preceded the term blog (check out the history of blogging for more).

225. Web Server

A web server is a program that uses HTTP (Hypertext Transfer Protocol) to serve the files that form web pages. A web server can contain one or more websites, and it’s what keeps your blog online.

226. Word Banning

A feature (offered by TypePad, another blogging service) used by bloggers to ban certain words from being displayed in their blog content or comment section.

X  —  Blogging Terms

Almost there! Blogging terms beginning with the letter X.

227. XML

XML or Extensible Markup Language is extremely useful in describing, sharing and transmitting technical data about your blog across the Internet. Not to be confused with Schema Markup data that’s now commonly used to communicate key information about your blog directly to search engines.

228. XHTML

Extensible HyperText Markup Language is the successor to HTML on which all web pages are now created today.

Y  —  Blogging Terms

Just one blogging term that starts with the letter Y.

229. Yoast

A popular WordPress plugin used by bloggers to improve their SEO. The plugin has become an essential tool in the blogger’s arsenal because of its ability to simplify SEO, set up great titles, write good meta descriptions and more.

Yoast SEO Plugin Blogging Terms Glossary

Z  —  Blogging Terms

Last but not least, our final blogging term that starts with the letter Z.

230. Zombie blog

A blog that’s considered spam.

Final Thoughts on Blogging Terms (Glossary) to Know

It can take years to fully master all of the blogging terms, shorthand, abbreviations and jargon out there in the world.

Don’t put undue pressure on yourself to memorize these, either. Bookmark this glossary of blogging terms to come back to anytime you’ve got a question about a term that doesn’t sound familiar to you. And if you want to learn more about growing a blog, check out these resources I’m frequently updating:

Now that we’ve made it through all of the key blogging terms you’ll need to know—head over to my ultimate guide to starting a blog and keep your progress going.

Want to Start Your Blog (the Right Way)?

Check out my ultimate guide How to Start a Blog (on the Side).


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Hello everyone,

Today we wanted to let you know that we are changing the commenting mechanism on Opera Blogs. What this means in practice is that we are replacing the former solution with a new commenting system that utilizes the Opera forums.

From now on, in addition to the usual comments section underneath the blog posts, you will be able to participate in the discussion directly on the Opera Forums. Moreover, blog posts on similar topics (like subsequent builds of a particular Opera version) can share the same comments thread – which means less noise and more productive discussions. If a similar question arises among people across different blog posts, we will also be able to direct you to an existing thread on the Opera Forums where your question might have already been answered.

This means you’ll be able to access the answers you need and comment at any time, joining our vast community at Opera Forums. To get started and add a comment, simply log in using your existing Opera account or create a free one.

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Coming up with the best blog layout and design functionality can be a difficult process with the sheer number of possibilities out there today.

To help you land on the right blog layout (that’ll attract and retain more readers), we’re going to break down the most crucial blog layout best practices and highlight 12 of the most impressive blog layout examples from real-life websites, blogs and publications—so that you can take inspiration from the best when designing your own blog layout.

By now, you’ve probably already started a blog of your own. You’re here for some inspiration (and advice) on coming up with the best possible blog layout that’ll create a great experience for your readers. And while writing great content and driving in traffic are two of the top considerations for bloggers, one aspect you may not have put as much thought into (yet) is the overall design and layout of your blog.

Those who’ve already started blogging probably chose a WordPress theme at the beginning and allowed the general format of that theme determine your blog’s layout… which is understandable (and what I did for several years here on my blog). Choosing a great theme is one way to make sure that your blog looks great, but it shouldn’t be the only factor in determining your blog layout.

Whether you’re just starting a blog—or thinking about redesigning your site, I’m going to show you several of the best blog layout examples, in addition to essential blog layout best practices you should follow in designing your blog.

12 Blog Layout Examples (and Best Practices to Follow) in 2020

  1. Fonts You Can Read
  2. Organize Your Blog Layout for Easier Access
  3. Design Your Blog Posts to Be Easily Scannable
  4. Utilize High-Quality Images (or Graphics)
  5. Consider Page Load Time
  6. Include Compelling CTAs (Calls to Action)
  7. The Fine Line Between Creative and Cluttered
  8. Encourage Engagement
  9. Brand Your Blog Layout
  10. Make Your Blog Layout Relate to Your Audience
  11. Blog Layout Examples to Learn From When Designing Your Blog

Disclosure: Please note that some of the links below are affiliate links and at no additional cost to you, I’ll earn a commission. When you purchase cheap web hosting using my one of my affiliate links, the company compensates me, which helps me run this blog and keep my content free of charge to you. Know that I also only recommend products I personally stand behind.


Why Does Your Blog Layout Matter?

Why do so many stress about their blog layout and design? Why does it really matter what your blog looks like—or how it’s designed?

Ryan Robinson's Blog Layout and Design (Homepage Screenshot) ryrob

Well for one, people are very visual in nature. Without giving it much thought, the vast majority of your readers are going to instantly make judgements about your blog the second they land on it.

If your blog layout looks unprofessional, outdated, confusing, or unappealing—there’s a good chance they’re going to question your credibility (or simply leave).

Here are three crucial reasons why you should care about your blog layout and overall site design.

  • High Bounce Rate: A high bounce rate is when readers come to your blog and leave very quickly. They don’t spend any real time on your blog, and they don’t click any of your internal links. While a high bounce rate is not solely dependent on your blog layout, it’s definitely a factor. Have you ever come across a blog post that looked like it was from the early 90s? Did you trust the content? Have you opened a blog post only to discover the text was almost impossible to read and there was an overwhelming amount of ads and popups? What do you do with these sites? Chances are, you press the back button and try to find a better source. You may even wonder why Google ranked that site well in the first place. This is why your blog layout matters. You want your blog to be welcoming to your visitors.
  • Low Rate of Return Readers: Let’s say someone clicks a link to your blog post. Your article has good content and answers their questions. However, they felt that your blog was poorly designed and difficult to actually consume information on. They probably won’t be returning to your blog in the future. That’s a problem, because you want returning visitors. People who come back to your blog will begin to feel a loyalty to you and your content. This loyal group of followers is more likely to promote your blog content to their networks—and sign up for your email newsletter. This is the most engaged group of people that you can hope to have as a blogger.
  • Trouble Navigating Your Blog: Your blog layout should be easy to navigate. Your visitors won’t spend a lot of time decoding your website, just to find out who you are or what your site is all about. They should be able to easily locate important links and develop a basic understanding of what your blog has to offer with very little effort.

Now that we’ve defined three compelling reasons why you should create a very thoughtful blog layout, let’s dive in and break down which blog layout elements are most important.


10 Blog Layout Best Practices (to Retain More Readers) in 2020

Though you’ll want your own blog to have a unique look within your niche, there are definitely some common best practices that all great blog layouts and designs share in common.

10 Blog Layout Best Practices to Follow (Stock Image of a Blog)

Here are ten best practices you can use in creating a winning blog layout today.

1. Fonts You Can Read

Choosing the right fonts to use across your blog sounds relatively simple, but it’s very important to your overall blog layout.

Your font choices shouldn’t detract from your content—and needs to be easy to read for your viewers.

What Font Size Should You Use?

  • Font sizes that are too small will be difficult to read
  • Medium to larger font sizes are preferable for online reading
  • This is even more important for people who have a hard time seeing smaller fonts

Generally, you want to have your body text font size set at a minimum of 16px.

You may be using a font that’s naturally a little bit bigger, and therefore you don’t need to go larger than 16px. Use your best judgment on this decision (based on who your readers are), but don’t be afraid to solicit some feedback from real people in making this decision.

Which Fonts Should You Use?

I recommend sticking to relatively basic fonts, at least for the body text (which people will be reading most). Simple fonts aren’t as visually exciting as some, but utilizing a simple font will be infinitely better for your readers—and will encourage them to keep progressing through your content, rather than turn around and run for the hills.

A good rule of thumb, is to avoid any font that feels like a novelty. Try to choose fonts that are easy to read and will age well. Clean, simple and legible is the goal. Here are some examples of fonts that’d work well for just about any smart blog layout.

Arial is a very dependable font that won’t steer you wrong. There’s nothing that really stands out about this font, but that can be an advantage when it comes to legibility in your blog layout.

Arial Font Screenshot (Good Fonts to Use in Your Blog Layout)

EB Garamond is another simple and easy to read font that I’ve used many times.

EB Garabond Font Screenshot (Good Fonts to Use in Your Blog Design)

Josefin Slab is a slightly more stylized alternative to Arial, but still retains an easy-to-read touch. My blog’s body text now uses a custom font these days, but it’s most similar to Josefin Slab.

Josefin Slab Font Screenshot (Good Fonts to Use in Your Blog Design)

Georgia is one of the most widely used fonts for bloggers.

Georgia Font Screenshot (Good Fonts to Use in Your Blog Design)

Helvetica Neue has been around since the early 1980s and comes in almost 100 different styles.

Helvetica Neue Font Screenshot (Good Fonts to Use in Your Blog Design)

If you go with one of these five font types for your body text, you’ll be in great shape (and your readers will thank you for it).

Which Fonts Should You Avoid?

Now, to make sure you don’t choose a font that’ll scare your readers, let’s look at a few examples of fonts you should not use in your blog layout.

Zapfino might look cool, but it would be very difficult to read as a primary font.

Zapfino Font Screenshot (Bad Fonts to Use in Your Blog Design)

At one time, Comic Sans MS was a very popular font. In the 1990s this font was everywhere. If you were to use this font today as your blog’s text you would definitely risk losing credibility. The hatred for Comic Sans is so real that people have written entire blog posts specifically talking about why people hate it so much.

Comic Sans Font Screenshot (Bad Fonts to Use in Your Blog Design)

Papyrus is another font that gets a bad rep. Like Comic Sans, this font was a shooting star. It was popular for a time, but would not be considered a credible blog font today.

Papyrus Font Screenshot (Bad Fonts to Use in Your Blog Design)

While you don’t need to choose one of the three fonts I recommended above for use in your blog layout, I highly recommend trying to pick a font that’s legible both for desktop readers and mobile device users—because if readers can’t actually read your blog posts, they’ll be gone in no time.

2. Organize Your Blog Layout for Easier Access

Organize Your Blog Content for Easier Accessibility (Image of Design Layout)

If you’ve already spent some time writing useful blog content, then you may have realized it can be hard to keep everything organized within an individual article (which is why I always start with a blog post outline), let alone from the macro perspective of your blog as a whole.

From the broader organizational standpoint, you may have written blog posts in a variety of different categories—and you need a way to separate them. Another issue, is that if you’ve written some really great posts in the past, they’re now naturally sitting at the bottom of your blog feed… where nobody will ever find them.

Someone visiting your blog for the first time today, may not know the easiest way to navigate through your posts. And that’s a shame, because you don’t want readers to miss out on finding your best content.

There are a lot of different ways to organize your blog content, but I’m going to give you a few ideas to help you start the process now. You can mix and match to find the best solution for your blog.

Tip #1: Pick a Defined Niche For Your Blog

One of the first things I recommend to both new and experienced bloggers alike, is to try and follow a somewhat narrow niche for your blog. That doesn’t mean that you have to write about the same thing every day, but there should be an overarching theme that you’re covering on your blog. An umbrella under which everything nicely sits within.

Sometimes bloggers want to write about what’s on their mind that day. And this can work in small doses—or if you’re running a more personal story that you don’t intend on ever monetizing. But for those who are hoping to make money blogging in a consistent manner, it’s a good idea to pick a clear focus that your blog can eventually become known for. Why?

  • For one, it’s a lot easier to rank your content in Google search results when your blog has a clear direction
  • Another reason to pick a defined niche, is so you can present a clear, consistent message to your blog readers
  • A niche also makes it easier for people to search your site.

If your site tries to cover too many topics at ones, it’s difficult to create a blog layout that connects all the main themes of your content together in any cohesive manner. Your visitors won’t know what to expect, and you’ll struggle to come up with a feasible way to direct them where they want to be.

Here’s an example of a blogger that’s chosen a very clear niche for her content. Strength and Sunshine is a blog that shares recipes and information about vegan, gluten and allergy-free foods (her description sits right in underneath the logo).

Strength and Sunshine Blog Homepage (Categories Screenshot) and Example

Every link in the top menu of her blog layout, is related to this specific diet—and her readers can expect that every recipe shared (and every blog post written) will have something to do with gluten-free and allergy-friendly cooking.

Tip #2: Use a “Start Here” Link

Many bloggers like to use a link in their main navigation menu titled something like “Start Here.” It’s often similar to an about page, but it goes into greater detail and usually offers clear instructions about what readers should do next. It’s a good way to introduce new visitors to your blog and share what your content is all about.

Here’s a list of a few things you should consider adding to your “Start Here” page:

  • An introduction about the blogger (or blog)
  • Glossary of common terms used on the blog
  • Links to your best and most popular content
  • Shopping links if your blog sells digital or physical products
  • Call to action like signing up for your blog’s newsletter

Now, let’s look at a great example of this in action. Clean Mama is a blogger who teaches people how to keep their homes clean (and is a very clever blog name idea, too).

Clean Mama Homepage Screenshot (Menu Example)

She has a “Start Here” section on her blog that does a good job of identifying some of her blog’s most central ideas.

Clean Mama About the Author Screenshot

First, she welcomes her readers and explains three ways her blog is going to help them right off the bat:

  • She’ll help you make your house ready for guests
  • She’ll help you find some grace even in the things you have to do every day
  • She’ll help you not feel so overwhelmed by your house chores

That’s expanded upon in a little mini-manifesto right here:

Clean Mama Compelling Essay to New Readers (Screenshot)

The next section she includes, elaborates on the idea of feeling overwhelmed—and affirms that she has solutions to help. Anyone reading this far will likely be pretty hooked into her methodologies.

She then goes on to explain some of her strategies for keeping your house clean without spending hours doing it (offering up tons of free value to new readers).

Clean Mama Content Organization Example (Screenshot of Categories)

Finally, she includes some helpful links (and clear next steps for visitors), like a shopping link and a round-up of her best cleaning tips.

Using a “Start Here” page can be a very useful tool for organizing your content and easily directing your readers where you want them to go.

Tip #3: Create a Learning Center

If you’ve already created a decent amount of content, a learning center—or detailed resource page like my “Everything about blogging” page—is another way to keep your content organized.

A learning center is a collection of categories arranged in one section (or drop-down menu). The idea is for readers to be able to quickly find answers to common questions on your blog. Learning centers are often arranged by media types like videos, blog posts and podcasts, as well as by general topics.

Smart Passive Income is a blog run by personal finance blogger, Pat Flynn, for aspiring online entrepreneurs. They use a very well-designed drop-down menu featuring a learning center for easier access to common topics they cover on the blog. Some of the topics they list include:

  • Affiliate Marketing
  • Business Development
  • Digital Marketing
  • Podcasting
  • Book Publishing
  • Online Courses
  • Email Marketing

All of these topics fit under the umbrella of online entrepreneurship, but each one is a bit more specific. You may have landed on their blog to learn more about affiliate marketing, and they’ve made it easier for you to access that information.

Smart Passive Income Homepage Layout Screenshot (Learning Center Menu)

If you click on the affiliate marketing menu item, it navigates you to a curated landing page that breaks down all of their top resources on the subject:

Smart Passive Income Learning Center (Affiliate Marketing) Screenshot Landing Page

Here you’re able to find a variety of helpful information about affiliate marketing, including how to go about finding and joining the best affiliate programs for bloggers. Here, they link to their best guides to affiliate marketing, courses they’ve created, additional articles, tools and podcast episodes related to subject. All of this is put on one single page for easy access to readers.

SPI Landing Page (Blog Layout Example) for Affiliate Marketing Topics

A learning center is best suited for a blog that already offers a lot of information, but wants to provide quick, easy access to specific categories that readers are already coming to your site for. And in that context, it really adds a lot of value to your blog layout in terms of creating a more reader-friendly experience.

3. Design Your Blog Posts to be Easily Scannable

Like it or not, writing for the Internet is very different than most other styles of writing.

Design Your Blog Posts to Be Easily Scannable (Computer Image)

It’s very different when compared to verbose academic writing or published books. When people read on the Internet, they (most often) want blog posts that are easy to scan and quickly digest the key points they’re searching for answers about.

That’s not to say people are unwilling to read long blog posts. Most people will read long-form articles from start to finish if they’re highly engaged in the subject matter. However, many people want to scan headlines to first determine if they want to read the article (or think they’ll be able to find answers to specific questions they have)—and often extend that scanning practice into how they read the content too.

I go into this in much greater depth in my guide about how to write a blog post outline, but here are some quick tips for formatting your blog posts:

  • Write short sections
  • Avoid big blocks of text
  • Break up text with images and headers
  • Organize sections by headers and sub-headers
  • Use bullet points or numbers to break up long sections of text

Let’s use this blog post right here as an example. Suppose I have a reader who came to my blog, looking for a very specific answer. Maybe they wanted to know what size font that I would recommend for their blog layout.

My headers should make it very easy for that reader to scan the blog post, in order to find the answer quickly—plus there’s a navigational table of content running along the right side of this article (when viewing on desktop).

For long blog posts, you can make it even easier by including a table of contents at the beginning of your blog post layouts—as I’ve done at the top here (and have a more stylized version for my guide about starting a blog too).

Using a Table of Contents to Enhance Your Blog Layout and Make Content Scannable (Screenshot of Menu)

Navigation is more important, the longer your blog content gets—so if you’re creating long-form content (like I do here on my blog), then you’ll want to go out of your way to make sure readers can quickly jump around throughout an article to more easily find what they’re looking for.

4. Utilize High-Quality Images (or Graphics)

Another mark of a great blog layout and design, is the use of high-quality images and graphics.

Use High Quality Images and Graphics to Enhance Your Blog Design (Screenshot of Computer with Design Elements)

If you’ve visited a site that has low-resolution images, or poorly made graphics, you know this can be a turn-off (or can lead you not to trust the site).

If you’re not already convinced of the benefit to using quality images on your blog, here are some blogging statistics that might persuade you:

  • A blog post with an image gets 94% more views.
  • According to online marketing influencer Jeff Bullas, “In an online store, customers think that the quality of a products image is more important than product-specific information (63%), a long description (54%) and ratings and reviews (53%).”
  • When people hear information, they generally remember 10% of the information when asked three days later. If an image is paired with the same information, people are able to retain 65% of the information after three days.
  • Just 3% of bloggers add 10+ images per article, but they are 2.5x more likely to report “strong results” than the average blogger. This statistic is a little harder to decode, but it’s essentially saying that bloggers who post 10+ images per post see better results than those who include fewer images. It may not be natural to fit 10 images into a short blog post, but it’s suggesting that more images make your overall blog layout more appealing.

This isn’t to say that high quality text (written content) is meaningless… because that’s far from true. Blogging is still largely about what it’s always been—and that’s still primarily the written word, because search engines like Google still “read” content through text.

What these statistics do mean however, is that your images matter as well—and high-quality images & graphics will make your blog layout that much more appealing, more shareable and more memorable to your readers.

Let’s look at the famous blog Humans of New York. The stories that HONY shares are compelling both because of the written text and the visual images. One without the other would not have the same lasting impact.

Humans of New York Blog Layout Screenshot (Stories Using Images Example)

Think of your images and graphics as an integral part of the story that you’re telling. The higher the quality, the better impression they’ll make on your blog readers.

5. Consider Page Load Time

Load time is another very important consideration when it comes to your overall blog layout.

Page Load Speed (Screenshot of Load Test) in Blog Design

As we just talked about, including visuals in your blog layout is extremely important. However, if your images, clunky WordPress plugins or other slow-loading content are clogging up your load time, then that’s a potentially big problem.

The truth is we’re pretty impatient—people won’t wait very long for a page to load. They may think your site isn’t working properly, or they may just not care enough to wait more than a couple of seconds. Here are some statistics that show the real need for fast page load times:

  • 53% of your visitors will leave your site if it takes more than 3 seconds to load
  • A one-second page response delay reduces conversion by 7%
  • Websites with a 1-3 second load time have a much lower bounce rate probability than those with a longer load time

Another good reason to keep your load time in check is your blog’s overall SEO profile. Load time is one of the key factors that Google uses to determine its search engine results rankings. The faster load time your blog has, the better chance it has of ranking high in organic search results.

So how do you make sure that your pages are loading quickly? Here are some easy ways to help optimize your load time.

Test Your Page Load Speed

The first step in determining which changes need to be made with your blog layout, is discovering what your current load speed is. You can use a free testing tool like Google’s PageSpeed Insights to gather these figures:

Google Page Speed Insights Tool (Screenshot) to See Page Load Time

After running a test with the Google PageSpeed Insights tool, you’ll get a list of actionable suggestions on where you can trim down your page load speed.

Remove Unnecessary Plugins

Removing Unnecessary Plugins (to Increase Your Blog Speed) Screenshot of WordPress plugins

If you’re using WordPress for your self-hosted blog then you’re probably familiar with plugins.

Plugins are extremely useful tools that help you do more with your blog—and there are many plugins I couldn’t live without. The downside of (some) plugins though, is that they can contribute to slower load times if they inject a lot of code into your site, in order to perform the additional functionality you want.

One way to combat this, is to get rid of plugins that are redundant or no longer useful to the core functions of your blog. You may have installed several plugins that do the same job without realizing it, too. If there are plugins that no longer help grow your blog or better monetize your content, then take some time to consider which plugins you can get by without.

Choose a Faster Hosting Plan

Bluehost Hosting Plans (for Faster Page Load Speed) Homepage Screenshot

Your blog’s hosting plan can make a big difference when it comes to the load time of your pages and posts. It may be tempting to pick from the absolute cheapest hosting plans when you’re just getting started on a tight budget—and that’s ok for a little while—but they often aren’t the best choice as your blog grows in time. You’ll want to upgrade.

You can learn a lot more about hosting from my guide to shared hosting, but when it comes to hosting recommendations, my top three are:

  • Bluehost (and their quick $5.45/mo choice plus plan)
  • Dreamhost (and their fast $2.59/mo plan)
  • SiteGround (and their speedy $5.95/mo plan)

All three of these recommendations perform well on independent speed tests, but Bluehost usually tests the fastest in terms of average page load speed. Each of these hosting companies offer affordable plans for bloggers, packed with a lot of features so you can’t go wrong when signing up with one (I’ve used all three over the years).

Choose a More Minimalist Blog Layout (or WordPress Theme)

One of the reasons I keep my own blog layout and design so simple, is to reduce the page load time it takes for readers to load my content.

You may not want to keep things quite as minimalist as I do here, but you can help your blog layout a lot in terms of load speed by choosing a WordPress theme that won’t slow your site down much.

The three WordPress themes I recommend that run very quickly and have only a light amount of code loading in their default settings include:

  • GeneratePress Pro WordPress theme (which I use a customized version of here)
  • Astra WordPress theme
  • If you want a theme with a visual page builder, the only one worth considering today (from a page load speed perspective) is Elementor Page Builder and their Hello Theme that pairs nicely with it

There are a lot more things you can do to slim down your blog layout’s page load time, but putting these simple best practices in place, is a perfect foundation.

6. Include Compelling CTAs (Calls to Action)

You’ve probably heard it before, but if you’re not totally familiar with the term, let me take a moment to explain what a call to action really is.

See this big header and form near the top of my homepage? That’s a call to action—and it’s asking readers to join my email list (if they’re interested in learning how to start a blog and grow a side business):

Call to Action Example (ryrob Homepage Screenshot)

Suppose you’ve started a blog about protecting marine life. We’ll imagine you’ve written a stellar blog post about the beauty of whales, their importance in the ecosystem and the dangers they face today.

As people read that blog post, what do you want them to do? What action are you hoping they’ll take next?

Here are some potential actions you’ll likely hope your reader will take:

  • Donate money to save the whales
  • Sign up for your newsletter
  • Go to other important articles on your blog for further reading

So how do you drive more readers toward an intended outcome with your blog layout? To help direct people, you need to frequently employ what’s known as a “Call to Action.” If you haven’t included a call to action within your blog post yet, many people will read it, leave your page and give it very little thought later.

It’s not that readers don’t care about whales, it’s that they weren’t given anything tangible to do next. You’ve alerted them to a problem, but you haven’t offered them any solutions.

It’s your job to make it super simple to help whales. Your first step as a blogger, is to expose an issue and the next is to offer really easy solutions to help with that problem.

Here’s how you can include CTAs that help further your cause:

  • Solution 1: Donate to organizations that help whales. Include links to several organizations that you support. Showing people exactly which organizations you recommend cuts down on their research time. They don’t have to spend additional time searching for reputable places to donate when you’ve presented them with organizations right on your page.
  • Solution 2: Join your email list. Tell your blog’s visitors that they can learn more about helping sea creatures by signing up for your email newsletter. The more they hear about sea animals, the more likely they will want to help—plus, you can give more clear directions on how to support the right organizations over email too.
  • Solution 3: Include links to other blog posts you’ve written. Another way you can use a CTA, is to include links to other blog posts you’ve written. Maybe one of the things you mentioned in your article about whales is the danger of plastic pollution. You can include a link to another article you’ve written about how to reduce plastic waste.

Now let’s look at a real-life example. The Wilderness Society is an organization that strives to protect public wildernesses in the United States. Check out this large call to action (to read a message from their president) right on the homepage:

The Wilderness Society Call to Action Example (Homepage) CTA Screenshot

Here’s how they’ve included CTAs within their top-level menu that’s loaded across all the pages on their site:

Wilderness Society Screenshot (Menu Call to Action Button Example)

At the top of their pages within their menu, they include several ways to get involved with the protection of wild lands:

  • Key Issues
  • News
  • Get Involved
  • Join
  • Donate

These links are easy to access and answer the most fundamental questions behind their mission. The “join” and “donate” buttons are easy to identify and understand.

They also include CTAs directly within their blog posts. In the middle of one blog post, they included a link to an article with more information on a similar, closely related topic.

Blog Layout with Inline Call to Action (Example Screenshot)

At the end of the article, they include links to additional articles related to caring for wild lands, followed by an easy way to sign up for their newsletter:

Email Newsletter Sign Up Call to Action (Screenshot)

Each one of these CTAs helps further their goals—and makes it much easier for readers to actually do something with the information they’re reading.

7. The Fine Line Between Creative and Cluttered

Not every blog layout or design needs to be as minimalist as mine. Here, we’re going to review a few alternative blog layouts that are very diverse in their design decisions—illustrating that you can be extremely creative without forfeiting ease of use and functionality.

Creative vs Cluttered Blog Design (Example)

However, it should be known that there’s a very fine line between creativity and chaos. If your blog readers can’t find your content easily (or feel instantly overwhelmed by the amount of things that are going on with your blog layout), then your site isn’t functioning at its highest potential.

Here are a few specific elements that can distract your readers from consuming your content:

Too Many Ads

Having well-placed advertisements on your blog can be a great way to increase your blog revenue. On the other hand, a blog that’s lit up with ads blinking in the header, footer, sidebar and in the middle of your content—can be extremely distracting. I can tell you that I’ve personally left many blogs without reading a word of content for this exact reason, and it’s a major reason why I removed ads from my own blog this year.

People are coming to your blog primarily to solve a problem they have, by searching for answers in your content. If there are too many ads muddling up your articles, you run the risk of looking like a spam site that’s hiding answers from readers for just long enough to get some extra ad impressions, instead of being a genuinely useful, reputable source of information.

A Messy Sidebar

There are certainly pros and cons when it comes to using your blog sidebar. Some people recommend not having one at all, while others say that it can be very helpful for navigation and tastefully promoting your blog content.

I tend to fall on the side of not utilizing much of a sidebar (aside from a table of contents with particularly lengthy articles), and I intentionally left it out of my new blog’s recent redesign. If you do choose to include a sidebar though, try to keep it as clean, simple and useful as possible.

Try to include only the most vital information that you want readers to know about and take action on. For everything else, put it in the footer.

No Use of Negative Space

Earlier, we talked about about the ways in which I thoughtfully utilize white space on my blog layout. Some bloggers feel the need to have text or images covering every inch of real estate on their blogs. My advice is not to be afraid of leaving some comfortable spacing throughout your blog layout, as it can often be more calming to readers than a design that’s jam-packed with elements.

Negative space also allows people to more easily locate important information on your blog. It gives you an opportunity to highlight the most essential features (or articles) on your blog.

What a Clean Blog Layout Looks Like

Now let’s look at a few real examples of blog layouts that have done an amazing job designing a look that’s unique, yet also very clean and easy to use.

Maptia is a travel and storytelling blog with a mission to help people learn more about the world and grow in empathy for people in other places and cultures. Here’s a look at their blog layout directly on the homepage:

Maptia Blog Layout Homepage Example (Clean and Minimalist)

At the top of their pages, they have a few key links followed by a visually interesting and well-designed header with three additional CTAs that are all relevant to their target readers.

Below that they have a featured story. Notice all the negative space around these items? I’d also point out their use of easy to read font and large high-quality images.

If you can’t tell, I really love their blog layout, especially for the travel blogging and storytelling niche.

Here’s another beautiful, creative and simple blog layout example from a travel blog called Rojo Cangrejo. At the top of their blog, there’s a huge sliding image with links. Even though the whole top of the page is covered, the text is still easy to read (the white text on the large image is easy to see too):

Rojo Cangrejo Simple, Minimalist Layout Example (Screenshot)

If you scroll down, you can see that they use a great deal of white space, too.

The Use of Negative Space in Crafting a Smart Layout for Your Blog (Screenshot and Example)

They continue with the use of negative space for additional story links toward the bottom of their pages too, which makes for a very nice and cohesive experience for readers.

Both of these blog layouts are unique to themselves, but they do a fantastic job of keeping their content accessible and very visually appealing at the same time—which is no easy feat.

8. Encourage Engagement

Engagement is king when it comes to Internet content. This is true both on social media and with blogging. As you can see across my blog here, I have many articles that have several hundred comments (and a few with over 1,000+ comments like my roundup of the best business ideas to pursue this year):

Encourage Engagement on Your Blog (for Better Interaction)

There are tons of guides about achieving greater engagement in order to better promote your blog, but in this post we’re examining this from a blog layout perspective. What can you do to encourage engagement as part of your own blog layout?

Here are a few ideas for ways to make your audience feel like they’re interacting with your content (and a part of the journey with you).

Show the Comment Count at the Top of Your Blog Post Layout

One of the best types of engagement for bloggers, is when readers comment on your blog posts. This is a perfect window into the thoughts your visitors are having, and an easy way to build a relationship with many of them. Plus, it helps establish more trust from readers who can also read your genuine replies in the comments section.

A great way to help readers become more interested in commenting, is by showcasing a comment count at the beginning of your blog posts. The more comments people have left, the more others will want to read the comments and potentially submit one themselves. I use this method on my own blog which you can see here on a recent blog income report:

Comment Count in Your Blog Post Layout (to Encourage Engagement)

Display a “Like” Button on Your Post

Another way to increase engagement on your blog posts, is to display a like button—whether or not it’s actually connected to a social media platform like Facebook.

This is very reminiscent of social media, and it gives people a quick way to show that they like what you’ve written.

Include Social Media Share Buttons

Make it easy for your visitors to share your content by including social media share buttons. I like to use the Click to Tweet link generator, so readers can lift specific quotes straight from my blog posts and share them right on their Twitter profiles (a social network where I discover and connect with lots of my readers).

Click to Tweet Twitter Share Button to Increase Blog Engagement (Screenshot)

Ask Readers if the Content You’re Sharing Has Helped Them

A common way to increase engagement with your readers, is by asking questions directly in your blog posts. Asking simple questions or opening an opportunity for them to ask questions is a great way to create conversations with more of your readers.

You can take this one step further and make it an integral part of your blog layout, too. A lot of online help centers include a button at the bottom of their content, asking if an article was helpful.

Here’s an example from a Google tutorial:

Ask Questions to Engage Your Blog Readers (Screenshot of Helpful)

If you choose the no response, they’ll prompt you to say what wasn’t helpful about the experience:

Screenshot of Google Feedback Widget (Example)

If you’re creating blog posts specifically designed to help people with a specific task, or answer a clear question, this could be a very savvy way to get immediate feedback on your content.

Ultimately, it starts a conversation that allows your readers to tell you if something is helpful or not. Those that take the time to give you an answer will show you what may be lacking from your tutorial—and you’ll (hopefully) receive some praise there too.

9. Brand Your Blog Layout

Your marketing 101 class will tell you that branding is a crucial part of creating lasting, long-term success. And it’s true, branding can help set you apart from the competition and makes you more recognizable to your customers (and prospects) across many mediums and metrics.

Branding Your Blog (Laptop with Stickers) Example

As you’re designing your own blog layout, look for opportunities to brand your site as being somehow unique. Your entire blog should be cohesive, and each page (or post) should match the look and feel of rest of your blog. For example, you wouldn’t want your homepage to be bland and then other pages to be in vibrant technicolor. Stick to a theme that makes sense for you.

Now, let’s go through some of the ways that you can use branding to make your blog layout that much better.

Define Your Message (and Personality)

You have a distinct personality and so should your blog.

  • What parts of you do you want to come out in your blog layout?
  • Are you attracted to bright colors or monochromatic themes?
  • Are you a photographer that wants to use a lot of images in your design?
  • Maybe you’re a designer that could use your blog layout as an opportunity to showcase your graphics?
  • If you’re a writer, take your layout as a way to highlight your style and tone.

Think about what parts of you need to be included as a core feature of your blog layout, and carry that idea throughout your site’s design.

Choose Your Branding Colors

Color is a very tangible way to brand your blog and choose a specific mood for the site. For my blog, I use a few specific shades of blue here. This color scheme is carried throughout my blog and in the graphics that I use for my blog post header images, too.

Ryan Robinson Blog Homepage (Colors for Branding) Example and Screenshot

There are a lot of theories about the use of color and how people interact with it, but I chose to lean on shares of blue largely out of personal preference for the color—and the very cool, calm, relatable sense that I feel it conveys to my readers.

  • Some people ascribe feelings to when they view certain colors.
  • Some colors may put people at ease, while others may make them uncomfortable.

You can even look up color charts to determine what kind of vibe you want your blog’s brand to exhibit. For example, green is often associated with growth and prosperity, while red is sometimes linked to energy and passion.

More than the color you choose, the way you implement it, is what matters most. Choose colors that complement each other and try to maintain a consistent color scheme throughout your blog layout, as not to confuse your regular readers. This will help you develop your branding strategy and become much more memorable over the long-haul.

Ignyte is a marketing firm based out of San Diego, California. While the core function of their website is to drive new business, they also have a blog component to their site. They use a shade of purple in a very unique way throughout their website. The results are pretty visually captivating:

Ignyte Blog Color Scheme Example (Screenshot)

Though it’s an unusual choice on the surface, their use of purple for text and images is memorable and visually appealing.

Example of Branding with Colors on Your Blog (Ignyte Screenshot)

Design a Captivating Logo for Your Blog

Logos are a part of our daily life without us even really noticing it. See mine in the top left corner of my blog menu?

Without looking it up, try to think of the logo for Nike. Now think about Apple products, Coca Cola and Disney. We all roughly know what these logos look like, and can imagine them instantly in our minds. Nike can brand a black t-shirt with nothing more than a tiny swoosh and just about everyone who sees that shirt will know who made it.

You see the golden arches and you’re already craving french fries and a burger.

That’s why a logo is so helpful as a part of your branding strategy. You can place your logo across your content and over time, readers will automatically identify it as yours.

Choose a Typography

We already discussed the importance of legible fonts for your blog, but once you’ve chosen your typography, use it consistently throughout your blog layout.

This is another way to ensure that you’re creating a brand and personality to your blog. There’s also the strategy of pairing fonts that work well together. If you use different fonts for your navigation menu, you want them to look good with the typography within the body text of your blog posts.

For an introduction to pairing fonts, you can check out Google’s font page. Every time you select a font, it shows you all the styles the font comes in—as well as the fonts it pairs best with. This is what it looks like:

Google Fonts Screenshot (and Pairings Example)

Some of your branding strategies will be influenced by the audience you’re trying to reach.

And since this is such a big part of your blog layout, I’ve dedicated my entire next best practice to making your blog layout specifically designed to appeal well to your target audience.

10. Make Your Blog Layout Relate to Your Audience

My final best practice for designing a winning blog layout, is to make layout decisions with your audience in mind—because what appeals to one group of people, may not be as relatable to another.

How to Design a Blog Structure for Your Audience (Computer Screenshot)

Now, let’s run through a couple of layout examples that show how you’d make design decisions based on the distinctly different audiences you want to attract.

The Blog Layout of a Fashion Site

The best way to explain the difference in layout structures, is to show you real-life examples. Let’s look at a fashion blog first, which is a space that’s intensely visual. While the style and feel of your text is important, the primary reason most people visit fashion blogs is to see fashion. That’s why it makes sense that fashion blogs are very image-dominant.

Not Jess Fashion is a fashion blog created by NYC digital influencer Jessica Wang. Her blog layout consists of a lot of full-size images and shop-able posts. Her writing is still an important aspect of her blogging, but the images are what really tell the story.

Here’s one of her recent blog posts, featuring a large right-aligned image and clear “shop the post” links next to the image, and near the top of her article.

Not Jess Fashion Example (of Images and Text Posts)

In her individual blog posts, she continues the trend of captivating, high-quality images intermixed with shorter areas of text.

For example, in her blog post How to Celebrate International Women’s Day she includes stunning photos of her daughters to express the story of what it means to celebrate women and to help raise awareness of a global water shortage problem. This combination of features works very well for the types of readers Jessica wants to reach.

Now that we’ve talked about a fashion blog, how does it compare to another blog niche?

Let’s look at a dramatically different example to really showcase how diverse your blog layout can be—depending on the audience you want to attract (and retain).

The Blog Layout of a Finance Site

Veering far away from fashion, let’s look at another popular blogging niche: finance and business. This time we’ll explore the distinguished publication, Forbes. Like the fashion blog we highlighted above, Forbes often leans heavily on using large high-quality images at the tops of their feature stories—giving it a very magazine-esque look.

Forbes Feature Story Header Image (Screenshot) Example

In addition to high quality images, they also regularly include graphs (like this one about the increase of daily users on Zoom this year):

Graph of Zoom User Numbers Going Up (Screenshot)

One major difference between the fashion blog and this article on Forbes, is that this piece has much longer blocks of text. The images are also front loaded, with heavier image use at the beginning of the article and fewer as you really dig into the core of the story.

In both examples though, the text is centered on the page—but in Forbes, the text blocks are a bit more narrow. It looks more like a print magazine, and is a format I follow in some ways here on my own blog layout.

You can also notice a big difference in color schemes. Where Not Jess Fashion tends to use bright pastels and creams, Forbes generally uses a darker color scheme with a few pops of bold colors when they want something to be emphasized.


Which Blog Layout Style Should You Use?

If you’re brand new to blogging, you may not be totally familiar with the likes and dislikes of your audience. You may not even know who your ideal audience is yet (and that’s ok).

A good way to figure this out, is to check out other blogs within your niche. Look through a dozen or so sites in your niche and notice what stands out about their blogs.

  • Do they have an exciting color scheme?
  • Do you love their graphics or imagery?
  • Do they have an exceptionally user-friendly navigation menu?
  • Does their blog layout feel bold or conservative?

To help jump-start your research, we’re going to dive into twelve blog layout examples below here now—showcasing several of my favorite blogs that have remarkable designs and clever layouts to give you some real inspiration. We’re going to walk through some very diverse blog layouts and styles that’ll show you it’s possible to tailor your blog to any audience.

Remember though… this is not a one-size-fits-all recommendation, because there are many different ways to create a successful blog layout, based on variables like who your audience is and any design statements you personally want to make.


12 Blog Layout Examples to Learn From When Designing Your Blog

Now that we’ve laid down the best practices for designing a winning blog layout, let’s see them in action by looking at some of the best blog layouts on the Internet.

1. The Intercept: Bold Blog Layout

The Intercept Homepage (Blog Layout Examples)

The Intercept is an online news source that provides investigations and analyses of topics like politics, war, national security, technology and the environment.

From a design standpoint, there are a lot of things you can learn from them. Their font choices are large, bold and easy to read. They also keep their blog layout very clean and take advantage of negative space to make their featured stories pop clearly.

The Intercept Screenshot of Top Stories

The top menu is broken down into the top news stories that they cover, and if you scroll down you’ll see large high-quality images that entice readers to keep reading.

2. Detailed: Conversion-Optimized, Minimalist Blog Layout

Detailed SEO Website Homepage Screenshot (Blog Layout Examples)

Detailed is an SEO insights blog, operated by famed SEO Glen Allsop, where he also offers SEO consulting & courses. What’s so special about the blog layout of Detailed?

We’ll start with their homepage. From the very top, Detailed is ready to grow their email list with a clear call to action above the fold. They’ve made it a top priority by placing it at the beginning of their page. Quick aside—if you haven’t already started doing so, I highly recommend ramping up your email marketing plan for your blog.

The next thing that Detailed does very well, is to establish their authority. They have positive reviews from a number of well-known publications and brands that they highlight clearly. People will recognize these brands and instantly begin to trust Detailed as a source of information about SEO. If Bloomberg and Forbes are offering their endorsement, this must be something good.

Now take look at the blog layout they’ve used on their blog feed page:

Detailed Blog Layout (Screenshot of Posts Page) and CTA

Once again, they’ve placed an email opt-in form at the very top of the page—also making it more enticing by including the names “Amazon” “IBM” and “Cisco” as subscribers on his list.

Detailed Blog Post Layout Example (Screenshot of a Post Example)

Scrolling down, we can analyze the design of their blog post. Detailed’s blog layout is very minimalist with a lot of white space around their images and text. On the sidebar, they show the companies who’ve endorsed them, as well as a ticker showing how many email subscribers they have—and how many people follow them on Facebook and Twitter. All great social proof.

Detailed does two things very well. The first is building trust with their readers and potential readers. They focus on showing visitors what makes them special and exactly what they offer. The second, is making their content interesting and engaging enough to entice readers to keep going.

Here are a few of the elements they use to make you want to continue reading their content:

  • Comments counter (encourages engagement)
  • An interesting snippet of text that leads into the blog post
  • A very clear “View Post” call to action button

Detailed’s blog layout is simple but very effective at converting their readers—and directing people to where they want to go.

3. Ahrefs: Visually Appealing and Easily Navigated Blog Layout

Ahrefs Homepage Screenshot (Blog Layout Examples)

Ahrefs is one of the top blogging tools that I can recommend to bloggers—and I use for all of my keyword research, competitor analysis, monitoring backlinks and for quick on-page SEO feedback.

In addition to their premium features, Ahrefs also has a very robust (free) library of blog content that provides helpful insights into SEO and digital marketing. We’ve already covered blog layout design points like minimalism and utilization of white space, so I’ll shift my focus a little with what makes the Ahrefs blog layout so appealing to me.

One thing that noticeably stands out about the Ahrefs blog layout, is its color scheme. They chose three main (complementary) colors for their design: blue, white, with small pops of a light orange. This color pattern is repeated in various forms throughout their website, in their logo and other visual elements.

Here’s a snapshot of the Ahrefs blog homepage:

The Ahrefs Blog Homepage (for Posts) and Example - Screenshot

You can see that they’ve alternated between their core colors of white and blue throughout their blog homepage. The top of the page has a blue graphic with white writing, while the blog posts feature blue headlines on a page of plan white with a little orange accent.

Their blog layout design is simple, but also very easy to navigate. At a glance, you can discover all of the information you’re seeking to find (and easily navigate right to it).

4. The New York Times: Organized Chaos Blog Layout

The New York Times Homepage Screenshot (Blog Layout Examples)

The New York Times has taken a great strategy in crafting their blog layout, by blending its print image with its digital one. As you can see, their site looks very similar to their print newspaper. Ordinarily, this blog layout may look way too overcrowded to a new visitor. However, most people who land here will already be familiar with this layout from the newspaper’s physical form. That makes this blog layout much easier to decode—and gives you a higher level of appreciation for the decision to lead with this design choice.

Another positive aspect about this style, is it allows you to see a lot of interesting content all at once. Some people will look at this front page and go directly to one of the top links—for example if they visited the NYT to look at real estate, they’ll head straight there. Others will be instantly drawn to the map of the United States and click into that story.

Despite the fact that there are a lot of things happening on this page, it’s still very organized with distinct sections and high-quality images.

5. Medium: Minimalist Publication-Style Blog Layout

Medium Homepage Screenshot (Blog Layout Examples)

Medium is one of the top free blogging platforms on the market, and they allow you to post new content (or repost content from an existing blog). It can be a great tool for promoting your existing blog content and getting more exposure with a new audience—but can also be used as a stand-alone blogging platform if you’re on a budget.

Something that instantly stands out about Medium’s blog layout, is its use of typography. They use large and easy to read fonts throughout the platform.

Medium Example of Bold Fonts and Easy to See Images

Unlike The New York Times, the overall design of Medium is very clean, easy to navigate and free from unnecessary clutter.

6. Adobe Create: Artistic and Creative Blog Layout

Many of the blog layouts I’ve highlighted so far have been a little more traditional & minimalist—but if you lean more creative, you’ll like the Adobe Create blog.

Adobe Create Homepage Screenshot (Blog Layout Examples)

Adobe has given people the ability to express their creativity with innovative tools like Photoshop, Illustrator, Lightroom, Audition and many more. Adobe Create is an accompanying blog dedicated to artists and creatives. Their blog shares inspiration and how-tos for photography, graphic design, illustration, UX and video. So what’s interesting about Adobe Create’s blog layout?

One element that stands out about this blog, is the artistic imagery that leads the way. Each section of the Adobe Create blog starts with a striking image:

Adobe Create Blog Imagery Examples (Screenshot)

This artistic flair continues as you scroll down the page. It’s clear that the featured images for each of their blog posts are chosen to be interesting, unique and beautiful.

Adobe Create Recent Stories (and Featured Images) Screenshot

This blog layout by Adobe relies very heavily on images to entertain their readers and encourage them to click through to read stories—much more than headlines traditionally do.

7. The Dowse Art Museum: Non-Traditional Gallery-Style Blog Layout

I wanted to include the Dowse Art Museum here as an example, because their blog layout is so completely different from just about any other site you’ll find yourself on today.

The Dowse Art Museum Homepage Screenshot (Blog Layout Examples)

While each blog post does certainly stand out from one another, they’re also placed in specific spots to look more like an art gallery display.

The Dowse Art Museum Gallery Blog Display (Unique Example) Screenshot

While probably not the best design choice for most bloggers, this is a very fun, unique and creative way to display posts and set them apart from more traditional blogs. And as an added bonus, the museum has gotten a lot of press and attention for their unique blog layout over the years.

8. WePresent: Bold, Image-Heavy Blog Layout

WePresent is a creative blog that showcases art, photography, music with a spotlight on diversity. This blog layout design allows the art to draw in readers, with very little text and has a consistent emphasis on imagery. Their blog homepage begins with one large cover story image and very minimal text:

WePresent Homepage Screenshot (Blog Layout Examples)

Below the cover story, it’s followed by a selection of images—with each image leading to a unique story on their blog.

WePresent Example of Images Used to Tell Stories (Screenshot)

It may seem like a risky move to post images with no explanation and expect people to continue reading. However, for this blog, they’re playing to their audience. They likely attract readers who will be interested in the images for their artistic quality. The effect is a blog layout that looks very much like an art display. It’s aesthetically captivating.

Further down, WePresent begins to introduce snippets of stories, but the taglines are just as interesting as their corresponding images.

WePresent Blog Design Example (Images Next to Content) Screenshot

WePresent is a great example of not only designing a unique blog layout that you don’t find much of online, but of also creating an experience that appeals to their target audience.

9. The House That Lars Built: Playful and Light Blog Layout

Another creative blog layout with a completely different feel, is The House That Lars Built. This blog covers an array of topics from crafts, interior design, decor and style. The first thing that stands out immediately about this blog layout, is their color scheme. They use pastel colors that feel joyful and light:

The House That Lars Built Homepage Screenshot (Blog Layout Examples)

The House that Lars Built, takes on the difficult task of including a lot of content without crossing over into an overly cluttered design. It’s a fine line to walk. Each section is visually interesting enough to make them distinct from other elements.

The House That Lars Built Individual Article Layout (Screenshot)

As with WePresent, this blog goes far out of its way to appeal to very particular audience—readers that are seeking bright, happy and uplifting images, artistic ideas and inspiration.

The House That Lars Built Example of Blog Design for Your Audience

10. Magnum Photos: Photography-First Blog Layout

Magnum Photos Homepage Screenshot (Blog Layout Examples)

Magnum Photos is a photography blog with a deep interest in storytelling. As with some of the other creative blogs, Magnum Photos uses photography as the primary blog layout vehicle to drive the story. Magnum Photos uses interesting images and high-quality photography to display their posts.

Many of the stories are also shared from history, so some of the images are in black and white. The use of black and white is a unique way to make images stand out, especially when the eye is accustomed to seeing pictures in color.

11. The New Yorker: Minimalist, Graphic-Driven Publication Blog Layout

The New Yorker Homepage Screenshot (Blog Layout Examples)

The New Yorker is known for using sarcasm and clever writing throughout their publication. This vibe continues with their choice of artwork and even their overall blog layout. They have a real personality that appeals very strongly to their audience.

Like The New York Times, The New Yorker has an online layout that’s reminiscent of the (original) print publication. As you peruse their site, you’ll feel like you’re looking at a physical magazine.

Here’s a sampling of recent stories from The New Yorker. The typography they use for their headings is easy to read, but a little more interesting than your basic Arial.

The New Yorker Story Examples and Typography Choices

They also use images that are unusual and sometimes even a little absurd, with the goal of catching the attention of a reader instantly. Why is someone holding a smoking piece of glass that resembles a cell phone?

The New Yorker is able to rely on its history of well-written publications, to entice readers to take a leap even when the snippets and images are ambiguous. They tease out just enough a story to make their readers want to learn more.

The New Yorker Story Headlines That Entice Readers to Click

12. The Verge: Futuristic, Bold, Tech-Driven Blog Layout

The Verge Homepage Screenshot (Blog Layout Examples)

The Verge is a multimedia blog that examines how technology changes the lives of people around the world. They predict which technological advancements are going to affect the average person down the road.

So what stands out about their blog layout? For one thing, their choice of design looks like a technicolor dream straight out of the 1980s. But instead of making the blog appear outdated, it makes visitors nostalgic for the 80s, when technology and the rise of computers started to change the landscape of our culture.

The Verge Blog Homepage Design (Screenshot)

The Verge doesn’t use a lot of negative space on their blog, but the way they use images and large bold fonts, keeps each section distinct and easy to find. The blog posts don’t just blend in with each other. Another thing to point out about this blog layout, is the way they break down sections. In the navigation menu, they list all of their top categories.

The Verge Drop Down Menu for Easy Navigation (Screenshot)

Each one has a hover drop-down menu that further breaks categories into more specific subcategories. This functions as a version of a learning center for readers to dive deeper into the subject they care about.

The Verge Menu of Navigation Items (Screenshot)

This kind of easy navigation is a staple of blog layout best practices, in terms of delivering a great user-experience for your readers.


My Own (Minimalist) Blog Layout and Design Here at ryrob.com

Since you’re on my blog right now, I want to wrap this guide up by showcasing my own blog layout, since I went through a complete redesign in early 2020.

The primary reason why I decided to redesign my blog layout, was because I’d been using the same theme & overall design format for more than five years. The technology was adding a lot of bloat to the pages on my site, making them load much slower than they needed to, and the visual elements didn’t feel representative of the person I’d become since I started my blog.

This new redesign simplified a lot of things, translated my very bold messaging style into visual elements across my site—and gave me a major performance boost too. So let’s dig into a few of these new layout elements.

Very Simple Design

One thing that stands out about my blog layout is how incredibly simple the design is. In my header menu, there are only a few easy to see links, my logo and a search bar.

Blog Post Layout Example (on ryrob) Screenshot

I omit a top header image on the blog homepage, and instead focus on my blog posts and featured images as the driving forces. This style of blog could be described as clean and minimalist.

The benefit of a minimalist design, is how easy it is for readers to navigate. Visitors on my blog won’t have to spend a lot of time locating important information about my blog. Everything is visible at a glance and the eye isn’t distracted by a lot of text and images.

Centered Article Collection (in Order of Publication Date)

In my recent website redesign, my blog posts went from a grid-style display, down to a list display. Now, instead of seeing multiple blog posts at once (which can be a little overwhelming), readers see one large featured image and the corresponding blog post at a time. These posts are in order of publication date:

 Blog Posts in Order of Publish Date in My Design (Screenshot)

Utilization of White Space

We already covered that my blog layout is intentionally minimalist, but one element of this is the utilization of white space. White space, sometimes called negative space, is the part of your blog layout that doesn’t have any kind of imagery, ads or text represented—nothing else is going on there.

As we talked about earlier, the purpose of negative space is to draw more attention to the key features you want to highlight on your blog.

If you’ve ever seen a blog full of blinking ads, sidebars and cluttered headers & footers, you know what I’m talking about. White space isn’t entirely necessary if the site still manages to look clean and professional. However, that negative space trains the reader’s eyes on where you want them to go.

Layout of My Blog Homepage (Screenshot)

Font Type and Sizing

Choosing a font size and type is relatively easy. The main thing here is to pick something that’s easy to read. Text that’s too small or hard to decipher will make your bounce rate higher.

And as we talked about earlier, I use a custom font that’s similar to Josefin Slab with a body text font size of 16px.

Enticing Descriptions and “Continue Reading” CTA Button

Whether they use a list or grid style to display your blog posts, most bloggers include a short description of their blog post to be sampled for readers. Your blog visitors are going to decide whether or not to continue reading based on the featured image and the description you’ve provided, so make it good.

Don’t squander this description. Try to write something that’ll entice them to keep reading, and include a “Continue Reading” call to action button:

Descriptions and Calls to Action in Your Blog Design (Screenshot)

Pagination at the Bottom

Another way to get people to continue reading your content is to put clear pagination at the bottom of your list of blog posts. This shows readers that you have more content and encourages them to discover more on your site.

Use of Pagination at the Bottom of Your Blog Homepage (Screenshot)

This feature also keeps your blog homepage from becoming overloaded with content that runs on a continuous scroll.

Taking Advantage of the Footer

The final thing I’d like to point out about my blog layout, is the footer. The footer of your blog can be used for a variety of key links, pages and calls to action. I take advantage of my footer section both on individual blog posts and on all the pages across my site, to encourage further engagement with my readers.

Blog Layout and Footer Screenshot Example of ryrob

In my footer section, I include a number of important links and I have them broken down into relevant sections.

I share additional blog posts people might be interested in, some of my most popular posts and my most recent podcast episodes. I also include a section called “Work With Me” that shares links to information about who I am, how to hire me, my best content and my contact information.

And though this is technically above the actual footer of my blog, I take full advantage of the end of each blog post by incorporating a clear, single call to action for my readers to take:

Call to Action Example from ryrob Blog (Screenshot)

This call to action lives at the bottom of just about every post on my blog—it’s in large text, asks a question and utilizes a unique button that readers can click on. The introduction of these elements makes it easier for people to find more relevant information.

At the bottom of each blog post, I also share some information about myself and my blog (as the author), and I have an easy to locate comment widget.

Blog Comments Widget and Author Bio Screenshot

That’s a wrap on the ways my own blog layout has been intentionally (re)designed earlier this year.

Each section of my blog is carefully thought out and planned to encourage people to stay on my blog and explore all that it has to offer.

The very minimalist style is meant to make it easy to find information—and feel extremely free from distraction when you’re reading one of my long-form guides (like this here).

Your blog layout may not look anything like mine… and that’s totally fine!

Diversity is a strength in the blogging world, so it’s better when our blogs aren’t just copies of each other. Even so, these blog layout and design best practices will make your own blog stand out.


What Are You Going to Do With Your Own Blog Layout?

How to Choose a Layout for Your Blog (Computer Photo)

Now that we’ve covered all of the most crucial blog layout best practices, and have analyzed a ton of blog layout examples, how will you structure the design of your own blog?

Now it’s time for you to take what you’ve learned—and apply it to your own blog layout and overall site design.

  • How are you going to take these blog layout ideas and tailor them to fit your vision?
  • What do you like (and dislike) about the blog layout examples you’ve seen here?
  • Did you find any blog layout mistakes you’ve made, that you’re now ready to fix?

Remember… nobody should ever create a carbon copy clone of another person’s blog layout. That’s a form of plagiarism. But you can still take a lot of inspiration from the blog layouts you’ve seen here in this guide, because they’ve been intentionally designed to attract (and retain) readers over the course of many years.

Grab the right WordPress theme that can set you down the path to perfecting your blog’s design today.

And keep in mind that these blog layouts you’ve seen here, follow proven best practices that are designed to keep your bounce rate low—and encourage people to return to your blog for more.

Want to Start Your Blog (the Right Way)?

Read my ultimate guide to starting a blog, which has been featured on Forbes, Entrepreneur and Business Insider.


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play immediately hit big

Click To Win

Hello

It was great to meet some of you in Lagos, Nigeria a few weeks ago and to hear your thoughts about Opera.

While there, we got up-close and personal and spoke with Seun, Mofe, Oluwaseunfunmi, and Tochi about how they had discovered Opera. They also told us how Opera browsers and Opera News, our standalone news application, have changed the way they interact with technology and the web.

We were thrilled to meet Tochi, a 25-year-old student who dreams of becoming a model in Nigeria.

Tochi got online for the first time as a child. He recalls that this then-new technology promised him a world where small devices would give him full access to all the information he wanted. Since it came out, Opera Mini has been by his side as a gateway to unlimited information, news articles and ebooks.

We were flattered to hear the many reasons why Opera Mini is Tochi’s favorite browser. He considers it a smart choice. He spends less money on data bundles by enabling the popular data saving feature in our browser.

We showed Tochi Opera Mini’s newest file-sharing feature. Tochi was excited to find out that he can now also share photos, videos and audio files offline with his friends and family.

This is something unique to Opera Mini, I haven’t seen any other browser with this feature.“ – Tochi.

Africa’s digitization rapidly growing with Opera

Some of you may know that we have more than 350 million users worldwide and nearly 120 million people are using the Opera browsers across Africa. Opera is well recognised in Africa and we are happy to see that people trust our products. They associate them with technology, change, and innovation. This puts us in a great position for continuing to improve our products and increase our user base.

In the 2019 edition of the State of the Mobile Web, we shed light on how we are leading the digital transformation in Africa by bringing people a better, faster and more effective way to access and interact with the internet through our browsers and standalone news applications.

Additionally, Opera will continue its expansion beyond browsers. Our goal is to make the digital lives of people like Tochi even better. We plan to do this by expanding our Fintech operations and by adding more digital services to our applications.

We hope you’ve enjoyed this blog post and we will soon share more stories from Nigeria!

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How to Do Blogger Outreach in 2020 (Template)


In this ultimate guide on how to do blogger outreach that stands out, I’m breaking down how I’ve personally used blogger outreach to help get 500,000+ monthly readers to my blog—including the exact blogger outreach email templates that’ve helped me land articles on sites like Forbes, Inc, Entrepreneur, Fast Company and more.

But before we get into the strategies, tactics and templates behind smart blogger outreach, let’s lay the foundation for why you should consider doing outreach in the first place.

You’ve started a blog. Now, however great your content is, the reality is that nobody will ever learn about your blog—unless you get the word out there.

And while your family on Facebook or friends on Twitter might be happy to cheer you on, you’re probably going to want to expand your audience beyond the people you already know. One of the best ways to grow your audience is through blogger outreach.

What is Blogger Outreach?

Blogger outreach is when you “reach out” to other bloggers, publishers or website owners who might be able to help get your name (and content) in front of their audiences. That’ll usually be through actions like sharing your content on their social channels, accepting a guest blog post from you, linking to a relevant article of yours, or even more creative outlets like appearing as a guest on their podcast, co-hosting a webinar, speaking at a conference or otherwise.

The ultimate goal of blogger outreach is to build your audience, credibility and business.

You want the blogger outreach you do, to have a tangible benefit in some way—it should lead to driving more traffic, generating new leads (email subscribers) or even direct revenue.

Even more importantly, when done right, blogger outreach should be a win-win relationship.


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The blogger or publisher you’re reaching out to should get something from your newly formed partnership too—like a great free piece of guest content for their blog, an expert quote for them to include in an upcoming article or even just a highly relevant resource suggestion they can share in a future post for their readers.

Today however, most blogger outreach is really bad. And that’s why I’ve compiled my ultimate guide to doing smart blogger outreach, so let’s jump in.

Blogger Outreach 101: How to Do Smart Blogger Outreach (+ Free Email Templates)

  1. The 3 Biggest Problems with (Most) Blogger Outreach Today
  2. Things to Avoid in Your Blogger Outreach Email Template
  3. How to Do Smart Blogger Outreach in 10 Easy Steps
  4. Good Examples: 3 Amazing Blogger Outreach Emails to Learn From
  5. Bad Examples: 7 Terrible Blogger Outreach Emails to Steer Clear of
  6. My 3 Best (Free) Blogger Outreach Email Templates to Use Today

Be sure to grab my free outreach email templates at the end of this guide!

Alright, now let’s dive into my ultimate guide on how to do blogger outreach (that doesn’t suck).

The 3 Biggest Problems with (Most) Blogger Outreach

Unfortunately, blogger outreach isn’t usually done very well. In fact, the vast majority of blogger outreach is so bad that it’s completely useless (and arguably hurts your promotion efforts much more than it ever helps).

Here’s a snapshot of just a few of the worst blogger outreach emails I’ve gotten in the past 3 days:

Blog Outreach Email Examples (Screenshot) and Template for How to Do Good Blog Outreach

There are literally thousands more of these terrible blogger outreach emails sitting unread in my trash right now.

The sad reality is that most of the blogger outreach I get comes in the form of mass, un-targeted emails that are rife with bad spelling mistakes and show clear signs of a broken automation tool at work (like mentioning the wrong website, calling me by the wrong name, broken formatting and so on).

Even the (few) blogger outreach emails that appear to be crafted with care—usually consist of:

Most blogger outreach sucks. But it doesn’t have to.

If you want your blogger outreach to be effective in growing your blog, start here:

Blogger Outreach Problem #1: Focus on Quantity (Not Quality)

Blogger outreach isn’t a numbers game.

It’s much better to build one solid relationship with a well-respected, highly relevant website owner that can introduce you to others in their network.

If you were to instead send out hundreds of emails all at once using an outreach automation tool—with the goal of trying to start dozens of conversations or score a higher volume of links from small, spammy websites—you’re all but wasting your time.

More on the nuances of link building (and why you shouldn’t do most “link building” in the first place) right here.

Blogger Outreach Problem #2: Not Personalizing Your Approach

As we’ll see in a moment when we touch on some real examples, many outreach emails aren’t personalized at all.

Even those that are personalized, they tend to only include the most basic of details—like the blogger’s name, website name or the mention of a particular article at best.

You want to be much more personal and engaging than that with your blogger outreach. Show you’re a real human by mentioning something you love about the blog the recipient’s work.

Blogger Outreach Problem #3: Not Offering Something Valuable First

If you’re contacting a blogger for the very first time, don’t immediately ask for a social share or guest posting opportunity.

Make sure you’re doing something useful (or at least offering them something useful) in your initial outreach email.

To figure out how you can be most useful to the blogger or publisher in question, think about what they want and need. Determine what’s feasible for you to accomplish for them by using your own skills, experience or relationships.

That could be things like:

  • Leaving thoughtful comments on their blog for a few days or weeks before emailing
  • Regularly sharing their content on your social media channels (and tagging them)
  • Mentioning or linking to their blog from an article you wrote
  • Turning one of their articles into a well-designed PDF eBook they can use
  • Pointing out a spelling mistake or broken link in an existing article on their site

The list could go on and on.

Ultimately though, successful blogger outreach boils down to starting a relationship on a foundation of providing value first (before asking for something from them).

At the very least, you need to offer something genuinely useful to your recipients—like a piece of free guest content for their blog, the promise to include a quote from them in an upcoming article on your blog (or in a guest post for a larger site if you’re still brand new to blogging).

Now, let’s walk through some case studies of real(ly) bad blogger outreach examples and I’ll show you exactly what to avoid in your own outreach efforts.

Things to Avoid in Your Blogger Outreach Email Templates

So what does it look like when blogger outreach goes very, very wrong?

Face Palm Email Fail

Let’s start by taking a look at some real life examples from inside my inbox right now:

Email Teardown #1: Mr. Webmaster Fastmoney’s Epic Fail

Where do we even begin with this one?

fast-money-loans-outreach-email-fail

In case the screenshot (above) is hard to read, here’s the text of that blogger outreach email:

Subject: GUEST POST

Hey There,

 I love your site and have been reading a lot of articles on here, its so well laid out and meticulous. I couldn’t help wondering since we are a small business and would love to write an article for you to publish on your website on a topic of your choice for a link back to our site.

Please provide me the topic you wish us to write about and we will provide you with the content for your approval. This is absolutely FREE and all we are asking for is credit in the form of a link back to our website. The article can be about anything you like and we will write you a 500 word article completely FREE!!

Ouch. This one’s pretty rough.

Based on how this email reads, would you want to take that “FREE” 500 word article for your blog?

Would you feel confident that you’re going to get a good piece of content from a reputable blogger?

There are a lot of things wrong with this blogger outreach email though, so let’s take them one-by-one:

  • The name of the sender. I mean come on, ha! The name “Webmaster Fastmoney” had me instantly laughing out loud upon seeing this. If I hadn’t been sourcing horrible blogger outreach email examples to highlight for this guide, I would’ve instantly spammed this one and never even considered opening it. Add the subject line into that quick analysis and wow, what a bad start.
  • The all caps subject line is spammy at best. Never send an email to a brand new recipient—especially one you’re hoping to partner with—using a subject line that’s in all capitalized text. It’s a miracle that my Gmail spam filters didn’t pull this one straight into the spam folder.
  • There’s not even a nod towards personalization. This blogger doesn’t bother to even use my name or the name of the site. Not to mention the fact that this email has clearly been sent to 50+ other recipients on the same exact thread.
  • It comes across as disingenuous. The first sentence says “I love your site,” but it’s easy to see from the email that it’s being sent to dozens of people all at the same time—so there’s no indication that this blogger has even read a single post on my blog. In fact, it suggests the opposite since they’re clearly sending identical emails to dozens (if not hundreds) of other bloggers.
  • There’s a grammatical error in the first sentence. We all make some mistakes, but you should be proofing your blogger outreach emails before hitting send. The word “its” should be “it’s” (short for “it is”) in the first sentence of this outreach email. While typos happen, when you’re asking for a guest posting opportunity, you can’t afford to give the immediate impression that your writing is going to be poorly edited.
  • The writing style is just plain bad. The second sentence, for instance, is long and convoluted and doesn’t really make sense—this blogger starts the sentence with “I couldn’t help wondering” but doesn’t actually pose a question, which makes the entire email a pretty confusing experience.
  • The emphasis on the word FREE looks very spammy. Putting “FREE” in all caps and doing it twice, comes across as desperate and pushy. It also seems like an odd selling point, as most bloggers will expect guest posts to be offered for free anyway.
  • There’s no actual pitch. This would-be guest poster asks me to do the work for them and “provide me the topic you wish us to write about.” As well as being rather ungrammatical, this is a red flag because good guest posters will be willing to suggest an idea that they feel they could do justice to.
  • There’s no indication of where “a link back to our website” would go. Bloggers with large sites have worked hard building their reputation, often over the course of years. We don’t want to risk harming that reputation by allowing a link to a spammy website, or one that runs counter to my values. Be transparent about what you’re hoping to achieve in your blogger outreach emails and you’ll have a much better shot at forming a genuine relationship.

Now that blogger outreach email example is truly one of the worst I’ve seen in quite a while.

So, to ease back into what makes a blogger outreach email actually stand out from the crowd—let’s walk through a bad example that’s not as egregious.

Email Teardown #2: The Most Common (Bad) Blogger Outreach Email Template

This outreach email is a great example of the “average” level of effort that goes into blogger outreach by most people.

While it isn’t terrible from a pure content perspective, it fails big time in trying to capture my interest. Though to the sender’s credit, this outreach email doesn’t have any glaring spelling or grammatical errors—it’s just not enticing enough for me to take action on.

Bad Outreach Email Example Teardown

In case the screenshot (above) is difficult to read, here’s the text of that blogger outreach email:

Subject: Guest post on ryrob.com

Hi there,

First of all, I would like to say that I enjoyed browsing ryrob.com. The content provided is genuine and engaging to read.

My name is [name] and I work for a company that employs a number of talented and experienced copywriters that deliver content on a wide variety of subjects.

I was wondering if you would be willing to accept an article that matches editorial style and topics of ryrob.com. Since an article would contain a contextually integrated link to our partner’s website we would be willing to reward you for publishing it.

Would you be interested?

Sincerely,

[Name]

While this isn’t anywhere near as bad as the previous example, it still leaves a lot to be desired (and most importantly—it wasn’t effective at getting me to take action on it).

Believe it or not, this blogger outreach email actually makes many of the same mistakes as our first one, including:

  • No meaningful personalization. Although there’s a small degree of personalization (with my blog URL in the subject line and the body of the email), there’s no indication that the sender has actually ever looked at my site. Plus, I happen to know there are tons of automation tools that can insert a website’s name into the body of an outreach email that’s done at scale—so from the very start I’m already skeptical here because it doesn’t address me by name.
  • The first sentence reads as a very generic template. “The content provided is genuine and engaging to read…” is a very vague compliment that could be used for almost any blog, suggesting again that this is part of a larger, automated outreach campaign.
  • It’s not clear who’d be writing the post or where I’d be linking. They mention, “a link to our partner’s website,” in the email which could be something that’s totally unrelated to my blog niche (or worse, a site that’s spammy and could damage my blog’s reputation).
  • Instead of promising a “FREE” post, this email makes an offer of payment. “We would be willing to reward you for publishing it”. While this may at first seem an attractive offer, seasoned bloggers will know that guest posters offering money won’t normally have high-quality content (which creates more work for me). On top of that, selling a “contextually integrated link” could land your site in hot water with search engines, unless you either Nofollow the link or mark it as sponsored—and it’s unlikely your would-be guest poster will accept those terms.

On the plus side though, there’s at least a straightforward request—to send me a guest post.

Though going back to our core foundation of smart blogger outreach here, I wouldn’t recommend making this kind of ask (especially without actually pitching a real idea) before building up a relationship with your recipient first.

How to Do Smart Blogger Outreach in 10 Easy Steps

It’s probably clear from these blogger outreach email examples, that there are lots of straightforward things you can do to get your outreach right.

Screenshot of Sending an Email to Your Prospect in Blog Promotion

Now, I’m going to walk you through this process step-by-step, to make crafting a standout outreach campaign as easy as possible for you. I’ll also share my own blogger outreach email templates that you can tweak, modify and use in your own blogger outreach.

Before we get started, though, here’s something important to remember:

If you’ve tried your hand at blogger outreach in the past and produced emails similar to the bad examples above—don’t worry.

You’re not here to be shamed… you’re here to learn how to do better blogger outreach that actually gets real results for the growth of your blog.

While it’s not ideal if you’ve already sent a lot of outreach emails that looked like our examples above—it’s not the end of the world, either.

Unless you’ve emailed the same bloggers over and over and over again, they’re very unlikely to remember your name or email address.

Successful bloggers get targeted with so many of these bad outreach emails that most of us just hit “delete” right away without internalizing any of the information about the sender.

So with that in mind… let’s learn how to do blogger outreach the right way.

1. Choose a Small Number of Bloggers to Reach Out to

The root of the problem with our bad examples above, is that the bloggers who sent these outreach emails are concentrating on sending out as many emails as possible.

If you’re doing that, it’s understandable that you’ll end up with minimal personalization—and that you’ll be pitching to some blogs that are (at best) only slightly related to your topic.

It’s better to pick a small number of bloggers to target for your outreach efforts.

When you take the approach of trying to connect with a smaller number of bloggers, it means that you can focus on really high-quality outreach, rather than treating your entire campaign as just a numbers game. Your entire outreach approach will be different (in a positive way).

A good place to start with who to reach out to in the first place, is with the blogs that you already follow and enjoy.

For example, if you run a blog that shares in-depth WordPress tutorials, then you’d probably consider reaching out to blogs in your space that produce content in related (but not directly competitive) fields. That might include blogs like mine that write about keyword phrases like:

Your goal could be something like landing a guest post, getting a quote featured, having your content shared on my social channel or otherwise.

If you don’t yet read many blogs in your niche, ask around for recommendations, do keyword research to see who’s already a heavy hitter in top search rankings, or look at what the big names in your industry are retweeting and sharing on social media.

2. Build a Relationship in Comments or on Social Media

While it’s not impossible to cold email someone for the first time—perhaps with a great guest post pitch—and have them accept, it’s always better to establish some kind of connection with the blogger before your email (with a request of them) lands in their inbox.

Here are a couple of good ways to build a value-driven relationship with bloggers before reaching out:

  • Commenting on their blog regularly. Leave thoughtful, useful comments over the course of a week or two before emailing and they’ll start to notice you. Make sure your comments are genuinely adding to the conversation, though. If you can’t think of anything to say for a particular piece other than “great post,” skip commenting on that one.
  • Sharing their content on your social media channels. Even if you don’t have a large following of your own, this is still a nice gesture and genuinely helpful thing to do—especially if you’re adding some genuine commentary, asking a compelling question and tagging the blogger. Whenever possible, add your own little snippet to the social share (like “I loved tip #9 here” or “great advice on SEO for new bloggers”), rather than simply sharing the title and link to the post. The more personalized your share, the more likely you’ll be to make a lasting impression.

If genuine, leaving regular blog comments works extremely well at building a foundational relationship.

Here’s an example of a couple comments (on a recent blog income report of mine) from readers that started by regularly leaving comments on my blog posts… and have since gone on to collaborate with me on a range of projects like guest posts, quote placements, social shares and more.

Blog Commenting Example of Building Relationships

Here are some great ways to go even further—and offer your target blogger something more valuable could include:

  • Linking to their blog from your own. Especially if you’re offering a recommendation, using one of their articles as a positive example of something, or including some sort of commentary about the blogger you’re trying to build a relationship with.
  • Rating and reviewing their podcast on iTunes. This is another extremely genuine way to help a blogger out, as well as a good way to get noticed by them. It also demonstrates that you’re actually listening to their content, which will come in handy in convincing them you’re really invested in them once you send your blogger outreach email.
  • Reviewing their book on Amazon or GoodReads. Like reviewing a podcast, this is truly helpful to the blogger in question—and shows that you’ve read at least a decent amount of their work (and in most cases, paid to do so).
  • Proactively offering a testimonial for their product or service. If you’ve bought one of their blogging courses, purchased a book, put a free template to good use or have used their services at some point, it’s incredibly helpful to reach out and offer a testimonial that the blogger can use in their marketing efforts or directly on their sales page. Very few people offer unsolicited testimonials, so this is a great way to stand out from the crowd—I can personally tell you this is a guaranteed way to get a response from a blogger like me. Plus, it also helps remind the blogger that you’re a paying customer.

3. Make a Highly Targeted Ask (Pitch Them Something They Can’t Refuse)

How to Build a Relationship with Bloggers and Provide Value First

Whatever you’re asking for—a quote with a link, a social share or a guest post slot—you need your pitch to be highly relevant to the blog and individual you’re reaching out to.

I hope it’s obvious that you shouldn’t pitch a guest post about “ten makeup tips” to a blog about SEO. But being highly relevant goes far beyond that simple example.

You need your ask to match up with the existing blog post ideas they tend to cover—and types of content the blog regularly produces.

For instance, if you’ve just written an in-depth guide aimed at bloggers who want to get started with SEO, it might make sense to ask for shoutout or share from a beginner-friendly site for bloggers, such as my blog here, or sites like ProBlogger and SmartBlogger. On the other hand, it probably wouldn’t be a good idea to ask an in-depth SEO publication like Ahrefs, to link to your guide, as it wouldn’t be the right fit for their audience or more advanced bloggers.

When you’re pitching a guest post, make sure your idea is tailor-made for the blog you’re reaching out to.

Don’t just outline a blog post and then figure out where you might be able to get it published. That’s going backwards (and won’t yield the same results).

Choose the right blog you’d like to get published on first… and then you can come up with a catchy title that’ll resonate with their editors, an enticing outline that’d be the perfect fit for them—and the chances will be much higher that they’ll give you a thumbs up to dive in and start writing a blog post for them.

4. Make it Worth Their While

Whatever you’re asking, make sure that it’s worthwhile for the blogger to spend their time and resources (1) evaluating and (2) taking action on your ask.

Example of Making Your Blog Outreach Worthwhile

Sure, it might only take them a minute or two in order to check out an article you sent and type out a quick tweet promoting it to their audience—but that’s an activity they’ll be doing on your behalf, instead of working on something of their own. Make your ask a no-brainer that also benefits them in some way.

Understand that your blogger outreach is asking the recipient to divert their time to something else—make it worth their while.

There are plenty of ways to make your blogger outreach ask a worthy endeavor for your prospective partner:

  • Link to them first. If you’re asking a prominent blogger to share your article on their social media channels, it’s great if that post already links to them or one of their products somewhere within the article. Note: You definitely shouldn’t make linking to them conditional on getting a share though!
  • Eliminate any potential friction. If you’re asking to write a guest post for their blog, do your absolute best to make the process as hassle-free for them as possible. Pitch a clear blog post idea with a simple structure that relates to content topics they regularly cover, so they can give you a quick “yes, let’s do it” or “no, that’s not for us” without having to do a lot of critical thinking (or back and forth communicating with you).
  • Use your own strengths. If you have a large enough audience—or have a friend that does—make it clear that you’ll help promote your guest post, or that you’ll be glad to share any of their content that could do with a boost. Note: This won’t have a lot of credibility if your audience only consists of a dozen Twitter followers.

Like I’ve said many times throughout this guide to smart blogger outreach…

Blogger outreach that makes an immediate ask is far less effective than when you show that you’re investing into the relationship first.

5. Don’t Offer Money in Your Blogger Outreach Email

Unless the blog specifically offers sponsorship options (which is normal in some industries) and you want to go down that path, it looks tacky and scammy to offer money in return for having your guest post published—or getting your content shared.

The offer of money in an initial outreach email is one of the big red flags I look out for when evaluating legitimacy.

One example of where you definitely should NOT offer money, is in exchange for a backlink.

Unless you’re fine with the link to be set to Nofollow (meaning it won’t pass on any SEO benefits), then this kind of outreach is a major no-go.

Paying for Dofollow links is forbidden under Google’s policies, and can have a lasting negative impact on both your own blog SEO and the SEO of the site linking to you.

6. Make a Clear (Simple) Request

Make a Clear Simple Ask in Your Blog Outreach Email Template

Whatever you’re asking for in your blogger outreach email, be clear and straightforward about it.

With a nearly 62% of emails being read on a mobile device today, the busy blogger reading your email may also have dozens (or even hundreds) of emails to get through today—and you don’t want them to decide that yours is too much work to deal with.

To make your request clear and simple, it’s a good idea to:

  • Write a subject line that succinctly reflects what you’re asking for. A few examples of great blogger outreach email subject lines include things like, “Guest post submission: Ten Ways to Get Your First Hundred Subscribers” or “Would you share my post about beginner-friendly SEO?” or “Your feature on my blog” which are all very clear. Subject lines like, “QUESTION” or “Hi” or “(no subject)” are usually instantly archived when I sort through my emails in the morning.
  • Ask for what you want early in the email. For example, if your blogger outreach starts with a subject line that makes it clear you’re hoping to guest post for the recipient, then it’d be smart to position your pitch (and why it’d be perfect for your blogger to run with) high up in the email—so that your recipient doesn’t have to read through paragraphs of text just to get to the purpose of your email.
  • Keep your blogger outreach email short and sweet. If you’re writing a novel in your outreach email, you’re doing something wrong. Remember the purpose of sending an outreach email in the first place… to open up a line of communication, start forming a relationship, provide value to your recipient and eventually make an ask they won’t want to refuse. Jump down to my blogger outreach email templates here toward the bottom of this guide for examples of my most effective emails you can use today.

To make your request simple and clear, it’s also important to be sure you’re only asking for one thing—not making multiple different requests. That can cause instant overwhelm.

Don’t ask your recipient to do something time consuming right off the bat.

Time intensive requests like, “will you review my blog?” or “will you meet up with me for coffee?” will come across as lacking proper awareness—especially if you haven’t yet established some sort of relationship with the blogger you’re reaching out to.

7. Offer Alternative Ideas

You don’t want to make your blogger outreach email unclear or overly complicated. That priority comes first and foremost.

Simple Outreach Email Example Screenshot

However, in some cases, it might make sense to offer your recipient a couple of quick alternatives to your original ask—especially if you’ve been cultivating the relationship for at least a few exchanges over email, in their blog comments and on their social feeds.

For example, you might pitch a particular guest post title with a quick outline. And at the end of your email, you could quickly add a clarifying sentence like, “If that idea doesn’t quite fit though, a couple of other articles I could write are How to Do Blogger Outreach in 2020 (Template) and How to Do Blogger Outreach in 2020 (Template).”

With this very simple mention of some alternative ideas, you’re not only showing your flexibility, but saving them from the back-and-forth of potential situations like, “We’ve already got something in the works on [title #1] – do you have any other ideas?”

Remember, your goal is to provide value to your recipient—so put yourself in their shoes before hitting send on your blogger outreach emails.

8. Edit and Proofread Your Blogger Outreach Email

Proofread Your Emails Before Sending

Once you’ve written your blogger outreach email, make sure you allow enough time to carefully edit and proofread it for any mistakes.

This doesn’t just mean checking for typos—though that’s obviously important too. You should also watch out for missteps like:

  • Sentences that are ambiguous or unclear. Rephrase these to make them more straightforward and easy for your recipient to understand.
  • Too much information. You don’t need to give multiple paragraphs of information about your background, the history of blogging or how that inspired you to launch your blog. Get straight to the point and make sure everything you’ve included in your blogger outreach email is extremely relevant to them.
  • Grammatical mistakes. Some easily confused words and phrases won’t be picked up by every spell checking tool (“its” and “it’s” are easy to confuse, as we saw in one of the bad examples above), so proofread slowly—and consult an online thesaurus if need be.
  • Incorrect personalized details. If you’re using a blogger outreach email template, be very careful not to copy and paste it with the wrong name or website name! Make sure you check the spelling, too—especially if the blogger has an unusual name, or the site has a name with unusual capitalization (i.e. “ProBlogger” has a capital in the middle, but “Copyblogger” doesn’t).

While a small mistake won’t necessarily ruin your chances of forging a relationship with your recipient, you do want to make the best possible first impression.

This is especially true if your blogger outreach contains any sort of pitch to create content for their audience—they’ll want to see you’ve got your writing down pat.

9. Don’t Push Your Luck

Remember, successful bloggers are busy people—they’re running an online business with a lot of moving parts and you’re probably popping into their inbox without an invitation.

Be Kind in Your Emails if You Want a Reply

If you don’t get a reply to your blogger outreach email within a day or two, don’t immediately send a follow up. Be patient and considerate.

My advice is to wait at least 5 days before following up, especially if your email is completely cold and you don’t have an existing relationship.

If they haven’t gotten back to your first email within a week, then the chances are high that either (1) they’re just extremely busy or (2) you haven’t delivered a pitch that was compelling enough for them to take action on. The safest bet is to assume both—which will inform on how you should best position your follow up. More on that soon.

If your recipient replies and the answer is no, then accept that (for now).

However great you think your content is, and however much you think they’re missing out—don’t try to persuade them to take your guest post or link to your content. If the blogger replies back and asks you not to email again, then respect that too.

The chances of them changing their mind are very slim. And even more importantly, they’ll be much less likely to want to collaborate with you in future if you get on their nerves during your first interaction.

Your ask probably wasn’t the right fit for them at this time, so don’t take it personally.

10. Follow Up on Your Blogger Outreach Emails

Right, right… you know that successful bloggers (and marketers, editors, publishers at top brands & websites) are all busy people.

The reality of our digital world today is that we’re more distracted than ever. And research shows that long-form content is becoming increasingly more important to ranking high in organic search—meaning that bloggers are having to spend more time on content creation than ever before, too.

It’s safe to assume that we’re all short on time. That means you should assume the need to follow up on your outreach emails in most cases—especially if you haven’t yet established a personal brand for yourself within your niche.

The success of your blogger outreach campaigns will be measured by your follow up game.

Steli Efti, Co-Founder of Close.com has a very simple follow up philosophy that he’s used to build a multi-million dollar startup, and it applies well to blogger outreach too.

He shares, “I follow up as many times as necessary until I get a response. I don’t care what the response is as long as I get one. If someone tells me they need another 14 days to get back to me, I will put that in my calendar and ping them again in 14 days. If they tell me they’re busy and they don’t have time right now, I will respond and ask them when they feel like a good time would be for me ping them. The key here is to actually keep following up. If someone tells me they are not interested—I leave them alone. But here is the kicker—if they don’t respond at all, I will keep pinging them until they do. And trust me, they always do.”

Steli goes on to share a story about how it took him 48 follow up attempts to get a potential investor to reply to him. Many months later, his persistence paid off and that person ended up investing.

Follow up until you get a definitive answer to your blogger outreach emails.

Now, let’s walk through a couple of examples to break down what successful follow ups look like in the context of blogger outreach.

Here’s an example of a really fun follow up email I got from Andriana Moskovska at Go Remotely:

Great Blog Outreach Follow Up

She had a pretty strong subject line and initial blogger outreach email in the first place, but I hadn’t replied as I was on vacation when her email came in.

Her follow up email is hilarious and starts by capturing my attention with a funny (fake) quote and GIF from a popular tv show I used to watch and have written about. Her email then wraps up with one polite sentence reiterating the request from her original email without trying to guilt trip me whatsoever.

Needless to say, Andriana got a reply after that awesome follow up.

Let’s look at another blogger outreach follow up email example.

This person has an admirable follow up hustle (2 follow ups within 14 days), but the content of those follow ups weren’t adding any value to the conversation:

Good Follow up on a Blog Outreach Email Template but Over-Used Template and Not so Relevant

Because I immediately deemed the original email and request not to be a good fit for my blog (plus it followed a very stale template I get multiple times per day), this blogger outreach was already off to a start that didn’t resonate with me.

Where the follow ups went wrong though, is that they never sought to add more (or different) value.

Both of these follow up emails from this blogger just followed the format of coldly nudging me to respond to their email.

They didn’t offer up an alternative idea, they weren’t humorous or interesting at all and they only referred me back to their original email without a reminder about the context of their initial ask (more work for me to do).

What happens when your blogger outreach succeeds?

On the other hand, let’s assume that your target blogger does do what you’re asking of them in your outreach email.

You need to make sure you follow up with them after they’ve done that too.

First, it’s important to thank them for taking time to work with you—which is just good manners.

Cultivate that relationship, especially if the first collaboration goes well.

Depending upon the size of their publishing organization, perhaps after a few weeks have gone by, you might want to send them another guest post pitch, or suggest another mutually beneficial collaboration.

Take care not to ping your content partners too frequently that you sour the relationship—particularly when you’re asking for something without providing more value first.

If this sounds like a broken record, it’s because so few people take the approach of giving value first in their outreach.

Continue helping them out by commenting on their blog posts and sharing their content on your social channels.

Good Examples: 3 Amazing Blogger Outreach Emails to Learn From

Alright, now that we’ve gone through my step-by-step process for writing a successful blogger outreach email, I thought it’d be fun to explore a few more examples of great outreach emails I’ve gotten over the past couple of weeks.

Good Outreach Email Example #1: Jon Dabach

This outreach email from Jon Dabach at Rhino Marketing Group blew my mind with how much up front value he delivered in his initial pitch:

Amazing Blog Outreach Email Example and Screenshot of Providing Insane Value

(Click here to open this full-size screenshot in a new tab)

His email starts with an excellent subject line that’s (1) funny and (2) immediately captured my attention.

It then dives straight into a genuine compliment of my content and a crazy value add—he took one of my existing articles and packaged it into a digital eBook for me (including some high quality images to go along with it).

This is all before making any ask of me whatsoever. How can I not reply to this?

We’re now working on making a potential collaboration happen over the coming months.

Good Outreach Email Example #2: Dane Maxwell

With a killer subject line, Dane Maxwell of The Foundation came in hot with great outreach email seeing if I’d be interested in reviewing his upcoming book, Start From Zero and for considering a podcast interview:

Excellent Blog Outreach Email Template with Everything Done Very Well

(Click here to open this full-size screenshot in a new tab)

This email is packed with great lessons you can apply to your own blogger outreach:

  • Starting with a compliment and showing that you have a real interest in your recipient
  • Building your credibility based on your own unique experiences
  • Making an ultra clear (relevant) ask
  • Note that the formatting of Dane’s email is also very clean, simple and doesn’t feel stressful

We’ll be doing a podcast interview soon—and have also found a couple other win-win collaborations that make a lot of sense.

Good Outreach Email Example #3: Josh Crist

Another recent great outreach email example pitching me on a podcast appearance came from Josh Crist of Be My Guest FM, where he delivered a very standout pitch to have on the CEO of Freshbooks (a brand I’ve worked with in the past):

One of the Best Blog Outreach Emails I've Gotten This Year (Promoting a Podcast Guest Appearance)

(Click here to open this full-size screenshot in a new tab)

Josh starts out by complimenting my podcast and sharing a screenshot of a 5-star review he just left on iTunes, which is light years ahead of any other guest pitch email I’ve ever received.

From there, he makes a very clear ask, establishes why it should be relevant to my audience (including three different angles I could consider for framing an episode), reinforces the guest’s credibility and wraps up with a clear sentence that reiterates his ask. This is a text book excellent outreach email.

There’s seriously so much about it that’s amazing—please parse through my commentary on the screenshot above.

Bad Examples: 7 Terrible Blogger Outreach Emails to Steer Clear of

Before we get into my personal blogger outreach email templates, I want to highlight a few more specific examples of bad outreach emails… so that you know what to steer clear of as you work on your own outreach campaign.

Bad Blogger Outreach Email Example #1: Formatting Disaster

Check out the formatting mistakes in this email—ranging from the subject line through the entire body of the email with spacing that’s off and content that’s packed with poor grammar:

Blog Outreach Email Example Terrible with Bad Formatting Screenshot

It feels like this one was sent using an automation tool that got something massively wrong. Plus, the email came from a very suspicious sounding @gmail.com account that doesn’t do anything to help their cause.

Bad Blogger Outreach Email Example #2: The Worst Formatting Blunders Ever

The subject line gets off to a terrible start by using my full blog URL directly in the subject (looks spammy).

And it truly only goes downhill from here with formatting mistakes and what looks like the entire body of the email being pasted in a total of 4 times (this screenshot only has the first three), including the names of different websites…

Hilariously Awful Example of a Blog Outreach Email Template Fail with Formatting, Typos, Subject Line, No Personalization and Huge Mistakes

This one is pretty surprisingly bad. Want to avoid sending an outreach email like this? Don’t use an automation tool.

Bad Blogger Outreach Email Example #3: Link Building Mishap

If anyone reaches out to me specifically talking about link building, I’m a pretty instant no (as that goes against Google policies):

Really Bad Blog Outreach Email Template (No Personalization and Bad Ask)

Add to the fact that this blogger outreach email isn’t personalized, has a lot of poor grammar, spelling mistakes and appears to be sent at scale—it’s a hard pass for me.

Bad Blogger Outreach Email Example #4: Paid Offer to Post Client Work

This outreach email is just a fancier wording of, “can I get a backlink for my client from your blog?” and offers to pay me for it. Again, an instant no because it goes against SEO best practices:

Bad Blog Outreach Email Example of No Personalization and Poor Formatting

There are some obvious formatting blips here too, that suggest this was sent to a big list of people using an automated tool of some sort as well—another sign that I should steer clear of this person.

Bad Blogger Outreach Email Example #5: Am I Experiencing Déjà Vu?

This (really bad) outreach email is shockingly similar to about a dozen others currently in my inbox:

Awful Blog Outreach Email Example Screenshot So Much Wrong

It’s also from an @gmail.com account and makes very little sense from a real conversation perspective. Nope.

Bad Blogger Outreach Email Example #6: Ok Now I’m Definitely Seeing Double

Yep, we’ve now confirmed that there are some awful email templates (and link builders who use them) floating around out there in the wild. I got this one on the same day as #5 above.

Shockingly Similar Blog Outreach Email Template Example and Screenshot of Bad Email

Again, we’ve got a bunch of formatting and grammar mistakes in addition to the email having zero substance. It’s gonna be a no for me dawg.

Bad Blogger Outreach Email Example #7: You Get the Point

Ok, ok… this is the last one, I promise. But come on, right?! This is exactly the same as the previous one:

Horrible Blog Outreach Email Example of Bad Subject Line, Stock Photo, Name and Poor Formatting, Spelling, Grammar Mistakes

I want to reiterate that the vast majority of blogger outreach I get is this bad.

Really, I’m not kidding.

If you want to send blogger outreach emails that actually get you real results… then use one of my templates here.

3 High Impact (Free) Blogger Outreach Email Templates to Use Today

If you’re not sure how to write a successful blogger outreach email, try using one of my free templates to guide you.

While you may want to change some of the language, verbiage and tone to suit your own voice and style—don’t worry about whether or not these blogger outreach emails will be “just another one of these common templates” that appear dozens of times in the inbox of bloggers and publishers each day.


Want My Free Blogger Outreach Email Templates?

Grab my 3 most effective blogger outreach email templates in both Google Doc and PDF format (100% free) and send better emails today.


These templates will forever stand the test of time, I promise that. Why?

These blogger outreach email templates will never be over-used… because they require doing real work, thinking strategically and providing up front value to your recipients.

I will continue using these three blogger outreach email templates for years to come—because they require work.

And building real relationships with other bloggers, brands and publishers requires putting in the work.

Those that aren’t willing to invest in the partnerships they want to build will send emails like some of the bad ones above, which make these templates rise even further above the noise.


Blogger Outreach Email Template #1: The Feature Notification

The entire premise of this blogger outreach email template is that it forces you to take the (first) step in providing value to the relationship you’re hoping to build here.

In this case, the upfront value comes in the form of a mention I gave the recipient at Copyhackers in a recent post on my blog (about how to name a blog), which I did strategically—knowing that I’d soon want to reach out to see about guest writing for their blog, where they have an audience very similar to my own.

Copyhackers blog outreach email template example and screenshot

Here’s a template version of that blogger outreach email you can use for yourself:

Subject: Your feature in my article

Hey [FIRSTNAME],

I’ve been a reader of the [COMPANY] blog for quite a while now, and I always come across your content in the writing I do for other sites like [SITE #1], [SITE #2], [SITE #3] and the like. I actually just mentioned you guys in a recent article I published (here) on the [DESTINATION] blog.

Would you be up for taking a guest post from me?

I’d be so pumped to do a piece of content for your readers and would work hard promoting it to my own blog audience, on social and amplify through other channels that I have access to as well 🙂

Let me know what you think!

[YOURNAME]

While you likely don’t have the same credentials and audience size to back up your pitch in the same way as I can (now) do today, don’t let that discourage you from using this outreach approach.

The important part about this angle is that it’s very strategic in starting the relationship off by doing something valuable for your recipient first… and even if you get turned down today, you’ll have a potential friendship here that can grow over time.


Blogger Outreach Email Template #2: The Genuine Guest Post Request

When I want to pitch a blog or publication on hosting a guest post from me, but I’ve never mentioned them in my writing before, I’ll use this blogger outreach email template that doesn’t lean as much on the upfront value angle—yet still shows that I’m willing to go to bat for making my article a success for them.

Content Collaboration Email Template Example

Here’s the template version of this email you can use:

Subject: Content collaboration

Hey [FIRSTNAME],

I’ve been a reader of the [COMPANY] blog for quite a while now, and I always come across your content in the writing I do for other sites like [SITE #1], [SITE #2], [SITE #3] and the like.

Would you be up for taking a guest post from me?

I’d be so pumped to do a piece of content for your readers and would work hard promoting it to my own blog audience, on social and amplify through other channels that I have access to as well 🙂

Let me know what you think!

[YOURNAME]

Sometimes, I’ll take my own advice here and include a couple of blog post ideas that I could write for them in this initial outreach email—but as I’ve built my brand and find that most other bloggers in my space already recognize me when I pop into their inboxes, I like to keep my first emails a little on the shorter side.

If you’re not quite at the stage I’m at yet with your audience, you might want to use a blogger outreach email template that makes the most of your existing credentials and pitches a specific guest post, like next one.


Blogger Outreach Email Template #3: The Curated Pitch

Here’s a blogger outreach email template I used from back in 2017 during the days before I really learned how to drive traffic to a blog (and long before I had an audience or figured out how to make money blogging).

It’s an example of how you can be successful at your blogger outreach efforts with a very simple, human and value-driven email—while having no existing audience of your own yet:

Blog Outreach Email Template Example Screenshot from My Early Days

Here’s a template version of this outreach email you can use today, that makes a more direct ask of accepting a guest post than what you’ll see in my screenshot from above. I encourage you to experiment with both versions:

Subject: Your feature on my blog

Hey [FIRSTNAME],

I’ve been a reader of the [COMPANY] blog for quite a while now, and I particularly loved your post [LAST WEEK/A FEW WEEKS BACK/ETC] about [TOPIC/TITLE]. I actually just mentioned you guys in a recent article I published (here) on my blog too.

Would you be up for taking a guest post from me? I’d love to write about [PROPOSED TITLE] and would cover [SHORT LIST OF WHAT YOU’D COVER IN THE POST].

You can check out some of my writing here too:

[Link to two or three of your best articles—ideally guest posts to help boost your credibility if you’ve written any]

Let me know what you think!

[YOURNAME]

And that’s a wrap, my friends 🙏

I hope you put these email templates to good use—and remember not to shy away from the (hard) work that is building real, value-driven relationships with the bloggers in your niche.

The investment will pay off, I promise.

Final Thoughts: Win-Win Blogger Outreach is the Way of the Future

In a world where 99% of blogger outreach emails immediately ask the recipient to take a one-sided action on behalf of the sender… it’s shockingly easy to stand out from the crowd and build real relationships with other bloggers.

By starting your outreach with a win-win proposition (and using templates like the ones here), you’ll be far more likely to succeed in your efforts.

Remember, effective blogger outreach isn’t about sending dozens (or hundreds) of emails.

It’s about finding a small number of bloggers and publishers you can authentically connect to and build a mutually beneficial relationship with.

The best blogger outreach emails will make your recipient think, hell yes!

Smart outreach offers something genuinely useful—like a piece of free guest content that the blogger’s readers will love—and the best outreach emails are written in a genuine, engaging way.

Get started with the first 3 steps to effective blogger outreach today:

  • Make a shortlist of the top ten bloggers you’d love to connect with and follow them on social media
  • Look for ways to help by sharing their content, answering their questions, or commenting on their posts
  • Plan to reach out to them with one of these outreach email templates within the next week or two

Like it or not, starting a blog and growing it into a profitable business is a long game.

And the relationships you can forge from win-win blogger outreach will help immensely over the weeks, months and years to come.


Want My Free Blogger Outreach Email Templates?

Grab my 3 most effective blogger outreach email templates in both Google Doc and PDF format (100% free) and send better emails today.


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How Opera Mini helps them in academic and professional life


Hello everyone,

A couple of weeks ago, when we met with some Opera users in Nigeria, we got the opportunity to talk with Oluwaseunfunmi and Seun who are both long-time Opera Mini users. They shared with us their life stories and experiences with the Opera Mini browser, telling us what using Opera Mini means to them.

Make the most of student life with Opera Mini

Oluwaseunfunmi is a recent graduate who has just landed a job at a digital marketing agency in Lagos. She told us that student life often required that she do a multitude of activities online, like searching for news articles, downloading files for her school projects and sometimes having meetings with her lecturers.

“Opera Mini has been very helpful because I can do a lot with it. Sometimes I needed to download files, share those files with my friends, or even meet my lecturers online—and all of this was just faster for me to do with Mini instead of using other browsers.” – Oluwaseunfunmi.

This is one of those times in everyday life when our newest file sharing feature in Opera Mini comes in handy. Every student can relate to Oluwaseunfunmi and the struggles of student life.

Student life required that she spend a lot of time online, and Oluwaseunfunmi noticed that using the data compression technology in the Opera Mini browser helped her reduce her mobile data expenses.

“Data here in Lagos, or in general in Nigeria, is very expensive. It’s a lot easier to deal with though when I use Opera Mini because it saves data a lot, so that really helped me as a student.” – Oluwaseunfunmi.

In her current transition from student life to working life we wish Oluwaseunfunmi nothing but the best. Also, we’re happy to hear that she now needs Opera Mini more than ever to help her learn more about her new occupation. We are even more pleased to hear that she is happy with the content she gets with Opera Mini and describes it as a smart browser which shows her exactly what she is looking for.

Stay on top of work with Opera Mini

Seun is a Product Director at OPay, the largest mobile payment company in Nigeria and also a long-time Opera Mini user. Her job requires that she always be informed about the latest news in technology and financial services, as well as new trends related to the mobile money market. 

“I’m constantly in touch with what’s going on so I can do a fair job of leading my team.” – Seun.

Seun browses the web a lot during the day, which most of us can relate to, and she has noticed how much this impacts her data consumption — the main reason why she likes Opera Mini.

“It does this thing called compression so that you are saving as much data as possible, as much as 90%, and I get more value for my money when I use Opera Mini. I love it!” – Seun.

By setting her data savings to Extreme, she is able to browse nine times longer with Opera Mini. Something that she is not able to do when using other browsers.

Besides saving data and searching for the latest trends on fintech, Seun shared that Opera Mini also functions as her guide when she wants to check entertainment content, or look up random facts such as the life and death of Cesar, the Roman Emperor.

SometimesI read a lot of whitepapers in PDF format, especially when I’m bored at social gatherings (laughs). This is something that I like, that I can download these files very fast. It makes the browser feels very light.”

Opera Mini, a helpful tool for everyone

Stories like the ones from Oluwaseunfunmi and Seun show that Opera Mini is a browser for everyone, from a student striving to get their degree to an established professional looking for industry trends. Especially with the offline file sharing functionalities and data savings, Opera Mini is a helpful tool in the everyday lives of many people.

In our recent State of the Mobile Web report, we have found that during the first quarter of 2019, Opera Mini users saved up to 2 million gigabytes in mobile data. This equates to approximately 20 million USD, or 1.5 billion NGN in money saved for users who enable data compression mode in their Opera browsers.

We hope you’ve enjoyed this blog post and we will soon share more stories from Nigeria!

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20+ Best Blog WordPress Themes for Personal & Freelance Blogging


A blog is a great way to be creative, grow your brand and flex your writing skills. Of all the possible blogging platforms WordPress is the best (or at least we think so – it’s what we use to run our blog that you’re reading right now). WordPress makes blogging easy and with the help of one of the best blog WordPress themes you can get started writing asap.

When looking at themes for your blog there are a few key factors to consider:

  • Layout: Choose a theme with a layout you like. If you want a masonry grid layout, it’s easier to pick a theme that has a masonry demo instead of installing a plugin and trying to make it work. Along the same lines – your theme should be responsive to ensure your blog looks great on any device.
  • Post Formats: Find a theme that can handle the media you want to upload. Whether you just want standard posts, videos, image galleries or quote double check that the theme you pick supports those formats.
  • Social Media: Any good blogging theme will include support for social media. Social media marketing is a huge part of growing your blog and online presence, which is why it’s so important that your blog posts are easy to share. A good WordPress blog theme will usually have social sharing options on posts, links in your header/footer and a social “follow” widget.

Those are just a few features we think an awesome WordPress blogging theme should have. Depending on your own needs you may also want a theme with WooCommerce compatibility, built-in ad spots to monetize your blog, an autoplay feature (in you’re thinking of starting a vlog), etc.

If you search for the best WordPress blog themes you’ll likely find thousands upon thousands of results. To save you some time, here’s our list of the best blog WordPress themes to get started blogging. We hope you enjoy!

Disclaimer: WPExplorer is an affiliate for one or more products listed below. If you click a link and complete a purchase we could make a commission.

1. Total

Total Multipurpose & Blogging WordPress Theme: Mason Demo

The Total drag & drop WordPress theme is a flexible, multipurpose theme perfect for any website design. It’s a top selling theme with over 32,000+ happy customers – which is why we keep recommending it! With built-in responsiveness, RTL support, A11y features, custom post types (portfolio, staff, testimonials), an easy to use page builder, premium animated sliders and more Total is an obvious choice for your blog or web design project.

Total Multipurpose & Blogging WordPress Theme: Charlotte Demo

Total also includes 40+ quick install sample demos, including the Mason and Charlotte blog demos seen above. This way you can simply install a sample demo to have your website started in minutes. The theme includes tons of blog-specific features including columns, lists, news layout, masonry grids and customizable dynamic page templates. Plus social is already integrate – so you can add sharing your posts right from the live Customizer.

2. Ashe (Free)

Ashe Personal & Multi-Author Free WordPress Blog Theme

Building a blog should be easy – and with the free Ashe WordPress theme it is. This stunning theme can be installed right from your WordPress dashboard and includes easy to use features to help you build a beautiful blog. Use built-in options for a boxed or full width site layout, choose custom background colors using the Live Customizer, upload your own custom logo and more. And since the theme is responsive and retina ready your blog will look great whether your readers are on their phone or their computer.

Other great theme features include a stunning featured homepage slider, right and left sidebars, featured ad areas (promo boxes), list layout, RTL and translation support. Plus Ashe is compatible with popular plugins like WooCommerce to add an e-commerce store, Contact Form 7, GDPR compliance plugins, and most page builders (Elementor, Visual Composer, Beaver etc) so you can design your own one of a kind layouts. And if you’re interested in getting even more from the theme you can upgrade to Ashe Pro for advanced paste, post and styling options.

3. Newspaper

Newspaper WordPress Theme for Blogs, Magazines & More

Newspaper is a great WordPress theme for any blog, magazine, news outlet or any other publishing site. As one of the top 10 best selling themes of all time (on Envato), you won’t be disappointed by this theme’s seemingly never ending list of powerful features. Choose from more than 80 demo designs, 810+ ready to use page elements and design templates for blog posts, pages, categories and archives. use the intuitive drag & drop builder (with custom grid and news elements not found in other themes) to easily create one of a kind layout designs. Plus built-in support for AMP, YouTube, Adsense, reviews, bbPress, WooCommerce and GDPR requirements put Newspaper over the top.

4. Activello (Free)

Activello Free WordPress Blog Theme

The Activello theme from Colorlib is a lovely blogging theme perfect for your to start your own website. This multipurpose theme is built on Bootstrap with features for slider, custom copyright, infinite scroll, vector icons, responsive layouts, unlimited colors and more. The theme is also compatible with popular plugins like WooCommerce, Contact Form 7, Yoast SEO, JetPack and W3 Total Cache for added features. Plus it’s completely FREE- what’s not to love?

5. Glamor

A Multi-Purpose Glam Blog Theme

Start your own glam blog with Glamor by QDONOW. This lovely theme offers tons of easy features, like multiple quick start demos (including lifestyle, entrepreneur, mommy, and food blog) so you can have a great looking website in minutes. Then you can customize your site with 800+ Google fonts, custom widgets, featured image sizing, layouts, color options and more. Plus with Glamor you can also monetize your site – via a WooCommerce store and predefined ad banner areas (header, sidebar, footer and below content sections. And if you need help at any point QDONOW offers free installation, detailed online documentation and direct email support!

6. Rosemary

Rosemary Responsive Blog WordPress Theme

Rosemary is lovely WordPress theme for any style blog. The clean and bright layout is the perfect blank slate for your content. The theme includes 5 different blog layouts, a featured slider, built-in color options and a responsive over all design. Rosemary also comes with custom blog widgets for your latest posts, promo box, about me, social media and more.

7. Divi

Divi Multipurpose, Blog WordPress Theme

The Divi theme is a popular and flexible option to build your website or blog. Built on the popular Divi page builder, there are tons of easy page elements to add images, text, skills, headings, email optins, search, shop, testimonials, pricing tables, sliders, portfolio, call to action, blurbs and more. But most importantly – Divi’s default blog is a great base for you to get started blogging. Create a stunning homepage with the builder, then use the post formats support to add your content (complete with images, videos, links or galleries).

8. Wanderlust

Wanderlust Travel Blog WordPress Theme

The Wanderlust blogging WordPress theme was designed to make sharing your adventures easy. Geared towards travel focused blogs or magazines, the Wanderlust theme includes full-width images, 10 post format styles to best display your media (images, video, audio), and a useful Instagram section above the footer to showcase you latest pics. Get started quickly using one of three pre-formatted homepage designs, the get to work adding your posts. Want to add a store? No problem. The theme is also fully compatible with WooCommerce for easy e-commerce options.

9. Mesa (Free)

Mesa Free WordPress Theme

Mesa is a completely free, 100% GPL blog theme for WordPress created right here at WPExplorer. This simple masonry blog style theme is perfect for your new blogging endeavor. The theme features simple styling options via the live Customizer (for responsiveness, header, social links, entry style/columns, ad spots, etc), plenty of post formats (standard, image, gallery, video, audio and quote), custom logo upload, built-in footer & sidebar ads and social link options (header and widget). Mesa is a quick and simple way to have your blog up and running!

10. Olsen

Olsen Light Free Blog WordPress Theme

Olsen Light is a lovely free blog WordPress theme you can use to start your own blog. While there is a premium version (which we highly recommend upgrading to), Olsen light has helpful features for integrating your social media, displaying an Instagram photo slider, uploading a logo, configuring your menu, and more options in the live Customizer. The theme also comes with blog-specific widgets for an “About Me” section, latest posts and social media. The Olsen theme is also compatible with the Elementor, Divi and/or SiteOrigin builders for even more powerful page building options.

11. Hemlock

Hemlock Responsive WordPress Blog  Theme

Hemlock is a stunning theme for aspiring bloggers. The theme has a unique featured posts homepage slider design to help you better showcase your best content. The theme includes all the features we mentioned that the best WordPress blogging themes should have – like built-in social sharing, plenty of post formats and solid layouts (choose from full-width, sidebar or grid blog). Plus the simple design makes it adaptable for any industry such as  fashion, tech, business, gardening, etc.

12. Amadeus Pro

Amadeus Pro WordPress Blogging Theme

The Amadeus blog WordPress theme is a great choice whether you want to blog as a hobby or to help promote your business. With Amadeus it’s easy to customize the look and feel of your website using the options for unlimited colors, logo, social and layout (all in the handy Theme Options Panel). Add a homepage slider, take advantage of the customizable sidebar widgets and choose your homepage layout (grid or columns) to create your own one of a kind blog.

13. New York (Blog & Shop)

New York WordPress Blog & Shop Theme

For those looking to build a blog as a business, New York is one of the best shop & blog WordPress themes you can choose. It’s the perfect theme to build an elegant blog to share your thoughts and tips, or to start your own online store with WooCommerce. The theme includes a unique homepage posts carousel, styled widgets (social, about, Instagram, recent posts, etc), two menu areas, a built-in footer Instagram feed grid and customizable copyright text. On top of the amazing blog features, the theme also comes with the powerful Yellow Pencil CSS editor plugin so you can tweak any part of the design with just a few clicks!

14. Essence Pro

Essence Pro Blog WordPress Theme

Essence Pro is a beautiful blogging child theme for the popular Genesis framework. Because it’s built on Genesis, the theme already includes important options for accessibility, custom header, responsiveness, translations, layout options, eCommerce and core page layouts. But what makes Essence Pro unique is the stylish homepage layout with featured image, newsletter optin and layered post grid design.

15. Ink Story

Ink Story Telling Blogging WordPress Theme

The Ink WordPress blog theme makes it easy to share your content. Design options for the theme are all neatly tucked into the live Customizer, where you can make changes to colors and fonts then see them live before you save. The theme’s stunning image grid homepage helps new posts standout, and since the theme is retina ready you can upload bigger, bolder photos.

16. Veggie

Veggie Blogging WordPress Theme

The Veggie Food Blog theme is a beautiful choice to start your own site with blog posts, recipes, video guides or anything else. This responsive blogging theme was created for food bloggers but would work great for any number of blog focuses. Easy customization options for colors, various layouts, page builder support (works great with Elementor, Beaver Builder or SiteOrigin), translation options, RTL compatibility and more all make Veggie a solid theme.

17. Authentic.

Authentic Lifestyle Blog WordPress Theme

The Authentic Lifestyle Blog theme includes 9 different demo designs to choose from to start your blog fast and easy. Pick your favorite with options for blog grid, sliders, styled overlays and more. The theme also has easy optins built-in to customize colors for over 67 theme aspects, header design options (with different menu, logo and social positions), customizable footer modules (add your logo, insert your Instagram, or use widgets), add video backgrounds, create a featured posts carousel and more.

18. Pineapple (Free)

Pineapple Free Tumblog WordPress Theme

Pineapple is a clean and simple tumblog style WordPress blogging theme. If you want to start a blog with just your social links and your content it really is the perfect theme. Pineapple features a clean centered layout, easy post formats (image, video, audio, quote), colorful category tags and built-in social media integration. The theme is also compatible with Yoast SEO (for breadcrumbs), Contact Form 7 and most other popular free WordPress plugins.

19. Peak

Peak Masonry Grid Blog WordPress Theme

The Peak theme is a grid based theme perfect for any online blog or magazine. The theme comes with 2 different homepage options for auto (masonry) or custom (you define image sizes) tiles, post drop cap (on first letter), multiple single post layouts and post formats, a built-in portfolio, mega menu option and even custom page title banners. The Peak theme is also compatible with the WooCommerce plugin – so you can add your own store or share affiliate goods with your readers.

20. TheBlogger

TheBlogger WordPress Blogging Theme

When considering the best blog WordPress themes we had to include TheBlogger of course. This blogging theme was designed to make (you guessed it) blogging easy. With intuitive Customizer options, built-in portfolio options, parallax backgrounds, intro background video, WooCommerce compatibility, color option, and unique layouts there’s lots to love about this WordPress blog theme.

21. Brittany

Brittany Light Free Blog WordPress Theme

Brittany Light is a traditional blog style layout with left side, single column content and a right hand side bar. But that is exactly what makes this theme great! It has options for custom widgets to add your social media links, newsletter signup, about me section and Instagram feed. The light version of the theme is a perfectly good theme to get your blog started. But if you want more features (like author box, color options, layouts, etc) we recommend upgrading to pro.

22. Let’s Blog

Let's Blog WordPress Theme

The Let’s Blog WordPress makes blogging a breeze. With one click demo import, 300+ theme Customizer settings and options, multiple blog layouts (with sliders, header images, carousels, grids, etc), galleries, custom sidebar widgets and an instant search there are a ton of great features within Let’s Blog so you can create a design worthy of your content.

23. Underwood

Underwood Story Blog WordPress Theme

If you’re looking for a good theme to create a personal blog, you can’t go wrong with the Underwood theme. This modern theme features bold typography, tons of post formats (9 in total for images, audio clips, video, galleries, etc), 3 unique homepage layout styles, WooCommerce support, styled Contact Form 7 fields and integrated social media.

24. Modern Studio Pro

Modern Studio Pro Blog WordPress Theme

Modern Studio Pro is another Genesis child theme. This means you have all of the same great features you’ve come to love about Genesis, with the added bonuses of some classy styling. This includes custom headers, backgrounds, color styles, page layouts, cusomtizer options, etc. Plus the theme adds 2 homepage widget areas and a lovely centered logo header style.

25. Recipes

Recipes Blogging WordPress Theme

Recipes is a stylish blogging premium WordPress theme perfect for sharing your favorite recipes with the world. This is a great theme for a restaurant blog, sharing vegan versions of your favorite recipes, blogging about copycat recipes or for any other food blog.

Cooking can involve a lot of trial and error, so why not share your delicious discoveries with the world? Recipes is a fantastic food blogging theme that you can use to publish and share your own tried and true recipes. The recipe custom post type makes it easy to add all the info your readers will need – including prep time, cooking time, ingredients and more.

Once you’ve added your awesome recipes, the theme includes options for your readers to rate your recipe. The theme also features sortable recipes pages, clickable ingredients lists, a “Print Recipe” option, and recipe author bios (great if you have multiple contributors to your food blog).

This theme is also translation ready, includes custom widgets for top rated and most recent recipes, built-in theme options, and it comes bundled with a child theme ready for your customizations.

Next Step: Choose One of the Best Blog WordPress Themes & Get Started!

With all of these awesome themes there are only two things left for you to do – pick one and start your blog!

We know there are a LOT of WordPress themes for blogging, but it’s important to choose a theme that’s right for you. Find a WordPress blog theme with solid code, good features and a layout you like. We’ve listed what (in our opinion) are some of the best blog WordPress themes. Hopefully there were a couple solid options for your blog in our roundup.

Then, get to work creating your content. If you’re not sure where to begin, try our easy 5-step guide to start a blog. We layout all the key parts to start your own blog with WordPress (trust us – it’s easy).

Have any questions about the themes listed above? Or do you have a theme we missed that you think should be on our list of the best blog WordPress themes? Leave a comment below!

Categories
Uncategorized

20+ Best Blog WordPress Themes for Personal & Freelance Blogging


A blog is a great way to be creative, grow your brand and flex your writing skills. Of all the possible blogging platforms WordPress is the best (or at least we think so – it’s what we use to run our blog that you’re reading right now). WordPress makes blogging easy and with the help of one of the best blog WordPress themes you can get started writing asap.

When looking at themes for your blog there are a few key factors to consider:

  • Layout: Choose a theme with a layout you like. If you want a masonry grid layout, it’s easier to pick a theme that has a masonry demo instead of installing a plugin and trying to make it work. Along the same lines – your theme should be responsive to ensure your blog looks great on any device.
  • Post Formats: Find a theme that can handle the media you want to upload. Whether you just want standard posts, videos, image galleries or quote double check that the theme you pick supports those formats.
  • Social Media: Any good blogging theme will include support for social media. Social media marketing is a huge part of growing your blog and online presence, which is why it’s so important that your blog posts are easy to share. A good WordPress blog theme will usually have social sharing options on posts, links in your header/footer and a social “follow” widget.

Those are just a few features we think an awesome WordPress blogging theme should have. Depending on your own needs you may also want a theme with WooCommerce compatibility, built-in ad spots to monetize your blog, an autoplay feature (in you’re thinking of starting a vlog), etc.

If you search for the best WordPress blog themes you’ll likely find thousands upon thousands of results. To save you some time, here’s our list of the best blog WordPress themes to get started blogging. We hope you enjoy!

Disclaimer: WPExplorer is an affiliate for one or more products listed below. If you click a link and complete a purchase we could make a commission.

1. Total

Total Multipurpose & Blogging WordPress Theme: Mason Demo

The Total drag & drop WordPress theme is a flexible, multipurpose theme perfect for any website design. It’s a top selling theme with over 32,000+ happy customers – which is why we keep recommending it! With built-in responsiveness, RTL support, A11y features, custom post types (portfolio, staff, testimonials), an easy to use page builder, premium animated sliders and more Total is an obvious choice for your blog or web design project.

Total Multipurpose & Blogging WordPress Theme: Charlotte Demo

Total also includes 40+ quick install sample demos, including the Mason and Charlotte blog demos seen above. This way you can simply install a sample demo to have your website started in minutes. The theme includes tons of blog-specific features including columns, lists, news layout, masonry grids and customizable dynamic page templates. Plus social is already integrate – so you can add sharing your posts right from the live Customizer.

2. Ashe (Free)

Ashe Personal & Multi-Author Free WordPress Blog Theme

Building a blog should be easy – and with the free Ashe WordPress theme it is. This stunning theme can be installed right from your WordPress dashboard and includes easy to use features to help you build a beautiful blog. Use built-in options for a boxed or full width site layout, choose custom background colors using the Live Customizer, upload your own custom logo and more. And since the theme is responsive and retina ready your blog will look great whether your readers are on their phone or their computer.

Other great theme features include a stunning featured homepage slider, right and left sidebars, featured ad areas (promo boxes), list layout, RTL and translation support. Plus Ashe is compatible with popular plugins like WooCommerce to add an e-commerce store, Contact Form 7, GDPR compliance plugins, and most page builders (Elementor, Visual Composer, Beaver etc) so you can design your own one of a kind layouts. And if you’re interested in getting even more from the theme you can upgrade to Ashe Pro for advanced paste, post and styling options.

3. Newspaper

Newspaper WordPress Theme for Blogs, Magazines & More

Newspaper is a great WordPress theme for any blog, magazine, news outlet or any other publishing site. As one of the top 10 best selling themes of all time (on Envato), you won’t be disappointed by this theme’s seemingly never ending list of powerful features. Choose from more than 80 demo designs, 810+ ready to use page elements and design templates for blog posts, pages, categories and archives. use the intuitive drag & drop builder (with custom grid and news elements not found in other themes) to easily create one of a kind layout designs. Plus built-in support for AMP, YouTube, Adsense, reviews, bbPress, WooCommerce and GDPR requirements put Newspaper over the top.

4. Activello (Free)

Activello Free WordPress Blog Theme

The Activello theme from Colorlib is a lovely blogging theme perfect for your to start your own website. This multipurpose theme is built on Bootstrap with features for slider, custom copyright, infinite scroll, vector icons, responsive layouts, unlimited colors and more. The theme is also compatible with popular plugins like WooCommerce, Contact Form 7, Yoast SEO, JetPack and W3 Total Cache for added features. Plus it’s completely FREE- what’s not to love?

5. Glamor

A Multi-Purpose Glam Blog Theme

Start your own glam blog with Glamor by QDONOW. This lovely theme offers tons of easy features, like multiple quick start demos (including lifestyle, entrepreneur, mommy, and food blog) so you can have a great looking website in minutes. Then you can customize your site with 800+ Google fonts, custom widgets, featured image sizing, layouts, color options and more. Plus with Glamor you can also monetize your site – via a WooCommerce store and predefined ad banner areas (header, sidebar, footer and below content sections. And if you need help at any point QDONOW offers free installation, detailed online documentation and direct email support!

6. Rosemary

Rosemary Responsive Blog WordPress Theme

Rosemary is lovely WordPress theme for any style blog. The clean and bright layout is the perfect blank slate for your content. The theme includes 5 different blog layouts, a featured slider, built-in color options and a responsive over all design. Rosemary also comes with custom blog widgets for your latest posts, promo box, about me, social media and more.

7. Divi

Divi Multipurpose, Blog WordPress Theme

The Divi theme is a popular and flexible option to build your website or blog. Built on the popular Divi page builder, there are tons of easy page elements to add images, text, skills, headings, email optins, search, shop, testimonials, pricing tables, sliders, portfolio, call to action, blurbs and more. But most importantly – Divi’s default blog is a great base for you to get started blogging. Create a stunning homepage with the builder, then use the post formats support to add your content (complete with images, videos, links or galleries).

8. Wanderlust

Wanderlust Travel Blog WordPress Theme

The Wanderlust blogging WordPress theme was designed to make sharing your adventures easy. Geared towards travel focused blogs or magazines, the Wanderlust theme includes full-width images, 10 post format styles to best display your media (images, video, audio), and a useful Instagram section above the footer to showcase you latest pics. Get started quickly using one of three pre-formatted homepage designs, the get to work adding your posts. Want to add a store? No problem. The theme is also fully compatible with WooCommerce for easy e-commerce options.

9. Mesa (Free)

Mesa Free WordPress Theme

Mesa is a completely free, 100% GPL blog theme for WordPress created right here at WPExplorer. This simple masonry blog style theme is perfect for your new blogging endeavor. The theme features simple styling options via the live Customizer (for responsiveness, header, social links, entry style/columns, ad spots, etc), plenty of post formats (standard, image, gallery, video, audio and quote), custom logo upload, built-in footer & sidebar ads and social link options (header and widget). Mesa is a quick and simple way to have your blog up and running!

10. Olsen

Olsen Light Free Blog WordPress Theme

Olsen Light is a lovely free blog WordPress theme you can use to start your own blog. While there is a premium version (which we highly recommend upgrading to), Olsen light has helpful features for integrating your social media, displaying an Instagram photo slider, uploading a logo, configuring your menu, and more options in the live Customizer. The theme also comes with blog-specific widgets for an “About Me” section, latest posts and social media. The Olsen theme is also compatible with the Elementor, Divi and/or SiteOrigin builders for even more powerful page building options.

11. Hemlock

Hemlock Responsive WordPress Blog  Theme

Hemlock is a stunning theme for aspiring bloggers. The theme has a unique featured posts homepage slider design to help you better showcase your best content. The theme includes all the features we mentioned that the best WordPress blogging themes should have – like built-in social sharing, plenty of post formats and solid layouts (choose from full-width, sidebar or grid blog). Plus the simple design makes it adaptable for any industry such as  fashion, tech, business, gardening, etc.

12. Amadeus Pro

Amadeus Pro WordPress Blogging Theme

The Amadeus blog WordPress theme is a great choice whether you want to blog as a hobby or to help promote your business. With Amadeus it’s easy to customize the look and feel of your website using the options for unlimited colors, logo, social and layout (all in the handy Theme Options Panel). Add a homepage slider, take advantage of the customizable sidebar widgets and choose your homepage layout (grid or columns) to create your own one of a kind blog.

13. New York (Blog & Shop)

New York WordPress Blog & Shop Theme

For those looking to build a blog as a business, New York is one of the best shop & blog WordPress themes you can choose. It’s the perfect theme to build an elegant blog to share your thoughts and tips, or to start your own online store with WooCommerce. The theme includes a unique homepage posts carousel, styled widgets (social, about, Instagram, recent posts, etc), two menu areas, a built-in footer Instagram feed grid and customizable copyright text. On top of the amazing blog features, the theme also comes with the powerful Yellow Pencil CSS editor plugin so you can tweak any part of the design with just a few clicks!

14. Essence Pro

Essence Pro Blog WordPress Theme

Essence Pro is a beautiful blogging child theme for the popular Genesis framework. Because it’s built on Genesis, the theme already includes important options for accessibility, custom header, responsiveness, translations, layout options, eCommerce and core page layouts. But what makes Essence Pro unique is the stylish homepage layout with featured image, newsletter optin and layered post grid design.

15. Ink Story

Ink Story Telling Blogging WordPress Theme

The Ink WordPress blog theme makes it easy to share your content. Design options for the theme are all neatly tucked into the live Customizer, where you can make changes to colors and fonts then see them live before you save. The theme’s stunning image grid homepage helps new posts standout, and since the theme is retina ready you can upload bigger, bolder photos.

16. Veggie

Veggie Blogging WordPress Theme

The Veggie Food Blog theme is a beautiful choice to start your own site with blog posts, recipes, video guides or anything else. This responsive blogging theme was created for food bloggers but would work great for any number of blog focuses. Easy customization options for colors, various layouts, page builder support (works great with Elementor, Beaver Builder or SiteOrigin), translation options, RTL compatibility and more all make Veggie a solid theme.

17. Authentic.

Authentic Lifestyle Blog WordPress Theme

The Authentic Lifestyle Blog theme includes 9 different demo designs to choose from to start your blog fast and easy. Pick your favorite with options for blog grid, sliders, styled overlays and more. The theme also has easy optins built-in to customize colors for over 67 theme aspects, header design options (with different menu, logo and social positions), customizable footer modules (add your logo, insert your Instagram, or use widgets), add video backgrounds, create a featured posts carousel and more.

18. Pineapple (Free)

Pineapple Free Tumblog WordPress Theme

Pineapple is a clean and simple tumblog style WordPress blogging theme. If you want to start a blog with just your social links and your content it really is the perfect theme. Pineapple features a clean centered layout, easy post formats (image, video, audio, quote), colorful category tags and built-in social media integration. The theme is also compatible with Yoast SEO (for breadcrumbs), Contact Form 7 and most other popular free WordPress plugins.

19. Peak

Peak Masonry Grid Blog WordPress Theme

The Peak theme is a grid based theme perfect for any online blog or magazine. The theme comes with 2 different homepage options for auto (masonry) or custom (you define image sizes) tiles, post drop cap (on first letter), multiple single post layouts and post formats, a built-in portfolio, mega menu option and even custom page title banners. The Peak theme is also compatible with the WooCommerce plugin – so you can add your own store or share affiliate goods with your readers.

20. TheBlogger

TheBlogger WordPress Blogging Theme

When considering the best blog WordPress themes we had to include TheBlogger of course. This blogging theme was designed to make (you guessed it) blogging easy. With intuitive Customizer options, built-in portfolio options, parallax backgrounds, intro background video, WooCommerce compatibility, color option, and unique layouts there’s lots to love about this WordPress blog theme.

21. Brittany

Brittany Light Free Blog WordPress Theme

Brittany Light is a traditional blog style layout with left side, single column content and a right hand side bar. But that is exactly what makes this theme great! It has options for custom widgets to add your social media links, newsletter signup, about me section and Instagram feed. The light version of the theme is a perfectly good theme to get your blog started. But if you want more features (like author box, color options, layouts, etc) we recommend upgrading to pro.

22. Let’s Blog

Let's Blog WordPress Theme

The Let’s Blog WordPress makes blogging a breeze. With one click demo import, 300+ theme Customizer settings and options, multiple blog layouts (with sliders, header images, carousels, grids, etc), galleries, custom sidebar widgets and an instant search there are a ton of great features within Let’s Blog so you can create a design worthy of your content.

23. Underwood

Underwood Story Blog WordPress Theme

If you’re looking for a good theme to create a personal blog, you can’t go wrong with the Underwood theme. This modern theme features bold typography, tons of post formats (9 in total for images, audio clips, video, galleries, etc), 3 unique homepage layout styles, WooCommerce support, styled Contact Form 7 fields and integrated social media.

24. Modern Studio Pro

Modern Studio Pro Blog WordPress Theme

Modern Studio Pro is another Genesis child theme. This means you have all of the same great features you’ve come to love about Genesis, with the added bonuses of some classy styling. This includes custom headers, backgrounds, color styles, page layouts, cusomtizer options, etc. Plus the theme adds 2 homepage widget areas and a lovely centered logo header style.

25. Recipes

Recipes Blogging WordPress Theme

Recipes is a stylish blogging premium WordPress theme perfect for sharing your favorite recipes with the world. This is a great theme for a restaurant blog, sharing vegan versions of your favorite recipes, blogging about copycat recipes or for any other food blog.

Cooking can involve a lot of trial and error, so why not share your delicious discoveries with the world? Recipes is a fantastic food blogging theme that you can use to publish and share your own tried and true recipes. The recipe custom post type makes it easy to add all the info your readers will need – including prep time, cooking time, ingredients and more.

Once you’ve added your awesome recipes, the theme includes options for your readers to rate your recipe. The theme also features sortable recipes pages, clickable ingredients lists, a “Print Recipe” option, and recipe author bios (great if you have multiple contributors to your food blog).

This theme is also translation ready, includes custom widgets for top rated and most recent recipes, built-in theme options, and it comes bundled with a child theme ready for your customizations.

Next Step: Choose One of the Best Blog WordPress Themes & Get Started!

With all of these awesome themes there are only two things left for you to do – pick one and start your blog!

We know there are a LOT of WordPress themes for blogging, but it’s important to choose a theme that’s right for you. Find a WordPress blog theme with solid code, good features and a layout you like. We’ve listed what (in our opinion) are some of the best blog WordPress themes. Hopefully there were a couple solid options for your blog in our roundup.

Then, get to work creating your content. If you’re not sure where to begin, try our easy 5-step guide to start a blog. We layout all the key parts to start your own blog with WordPress (trust us – it’s easy).

Have any questions about the themes listed above? Or do you have a theme we missed that you think should be on our list of the best blog WordPress themes? Leave a comment below!

Categories
Uncategorized

20+ Best Blog WordPress Themes for Personal & Freelance Blogging


A blog is a great way to be creative, grow your brand and flex your writing skills. Of all the possible blogging platforms WordPress is the best (or at least we think so – it’s what we use to run our blog that you’re reading right now). WordPress makes blogging easy and with the help of one of the best blog WordPress themes you can get started writing asap.

When looking at themes for your blog there are a few key factors to consider:

  • Layout: Choose a theme with a layout you like. If you want a masonry grid layout, it’s easier to pick a theme that has a masonry demo instead of installing a plugin and trying to make it work. Along the same lines – your theme should be responsive to ensure your blog looks great on any device.
  • Post Formats: Find a theme that can handle the media you want to upload. Whether you just want standard posts, videos, image galleries or quote double check that the theme you pick supports those formats.
  • Social Media: Any good blogging theme will include support for social media. Social media marketing is a huge part of growing your blog and online presence, which is why it’s so important that your blog posts are easy to share. A good WordPress blog theme will usually have social sharing options on posts, links in your header/footer and a social “follow” widget.

Those are just a few features we think an awesome WordPress blogging theme should have. Depending on your own needs you may also want a theme with WooCommerce compatibility, built-in ad spots to monetize your blog, an autoplay feature (in you’re thinking of starting a vlog), etc.

If you search for the best WordPress blog themes you’ll likely find thousands upon thousands of results. To save you some time, here’s our list of the best blog WordPress themes to get started blogging. We hope you enjoy!

Disclaimer: WPExplorer is an affiliate for one or more products listed below. If you click a link and complete a purchase we could make a commission.

1. Total

Total Multipurpose & Blogging WordPress Theme: Mason Demo

The Total drag & drop WordPress theme is a flexible, multipurpose theme perfect for any website design. It’s a top selling theme with over 32,000+ happy customers – which is why we keep recommending it! With built-in responsiveness, RTL support, A11y features, custom post types (portfolio, staff, testimonials), an easy to use page builder, premium animated sliders and more Total is an obvious choice for your blog or web design project.

Total Multipurpose & Blogging WordPress Theme: Charlotte Demo

Total also includes 40+ quick install sample demos, including the Mason and Charlotte blog demos seen above. This way you can simply install a sample demo to have your website started in minutes. The theme includes tons of blog-specific features including columns, lists, news layout, masonry grids and customizable dynamic page templates. Plus social is already integrate – so you can add sharing your posts right from the live Customizer.

2. Ashe (Free)

Ashe Personal & Multi-Author Free WordPress Blog Theme

Building a blog should be easy – and with the free Ashe WordPress theme it is. This stunning theme can be installed right from your WordPress dashboard and includes easy to use features to help you build a beautiful blog. Use built-in options for a boxed or full width site layout, choose custom background colors using the Live Customizer, upload your own custom logo and more. And since the theme is responsive and retina ready your blog will look great whether your readers are on their phone or their computer.

Other great theme features include a stunning featured homepage slider, right and left sidebars, featured ad areas (promo boxes), list layout, RTL and translation support. Plus Ashe is compatible with popular plugins like WooCommerce to add an e-commerce store, Contact Form 7, GDPR compliance plugins, and most page builders (Elementor, Visual Composer, Beaver etc) so you can design your own one of a kind layouts. And if you’re interested in getting even more from the theme you can upgrade to Ashe Pro for advanced paste, post and styling options.

3. Newspaper

Newspaper WordPress Theme for Blogs, Magazines & More

Newspaper is a great WordPress theme for any blog, magazine, news outlet or any other publishing site. As one of the top 10 best selling themes of all time (on Envato), you won’t be disappointed by this theme’s seemingly never ending list of powerful features. Choose from more than 80 demo designs, 810+ ready to use page elements and design templates for blog posts, pages, categories and archives. use the intuitive drag & drop builder (with custom grid and news elements not found in other themes) to easily create one of a kind layout designs. Plus built-in support for AMP, YouTube, Adsense, reviews, bbPress, WooCommerce and GDPR requirements put Newspaper over the top.

4. Activello (Free)

Activello Free WordPress Blog Theme

The Activello theme from Colorlib is a lovely blogging theme perfect for your to start your own website. This multipurpose theme is built on Bootstrap with features for slider, custom copyright, infinite scroll, vector icons, responsive layouts, unlimited colors and more. The theme is also compatible with popular plugins like WooCommerce, Contact Form 7, Yoast SEO, JetPack and W3 Total Cache for added features. Plus it’s completely FREE- what’s not to love?

5. Glamor

A Multi-Purpose Glam Blog Theme

Start your own glam blog with Glamor by QDONOW. This lovely theme offers tons of easy features, like multiple quick start demos (including lifestyle, entrepreneur, mommy, and food blog) so you can have a great looking website in minutes. Then you can customize your site with 800+ Google fonts, custom widgets, featured image sizing, layouts, color options and more. Plus with Glamor you can also monetize your site – via a WooCommerce store and predefined ad banner areas (header, sidebar, footer and below content sections. And if you need help at any point QDONOW offers free installation, detailed online documentation and direct email support!

6. Rosemary

Rosemary Responsive Blog WordPress Theme

Rosemary is lovely WordPress theme for any style blog. The clean and bright layout is the perfect blank slate for your content. The theme includes 5 different blog layouts, a featured slider, built-in color options and a responsive over all design. Rosemary also comes with custom blog widgets for your latest posts, promo box, about me, social media and more.

7. Divi

Divi Multipurpose, Blog WordPress Theme

The Divi theme is a popular and flexible option to build your website or blog. Built on the popular Divi page builder, there are tons of easy page elements to add images, text, skills, headings, email optins, search, shop, testimonials, pricing tables, sliders, portfolio, call to action, blurbs and more. But most importantly – Divi’s default blog is a great base for you to get started blogging. Create a stunning homepage with the builder, then use the post formats support to add your content (complete with images, videos, links or galleries).

8. Wanderlust

Wanderlust Travel Blog WordPress Theme

The Wanderlust blogging WordPress theme was designed to make sharing your adventures easy. Geared towards travel focused blogs or magazines, the Wanderlust theme includes full-width images, 10 post format styles to best display your media (images, video, audio), and a useful Instagram section above the footer to showcase you latest pics. Get started quickly using one of three pre-formatted homepage designs, the get to work adding your posts. Want to add a store? No problem. The theme is also fully compatible with WooCommerce for easy e-commerce options.

9. Mesa (Free)

Mesa Free WordPress Theme

Mesa is a completely free, 100% GPL blog theme for WordPress created right here at WPExplorer. This simple masonry blog style theme is perfect for your new blogging endeavor. The theme features simple styling options via the live Customizer (for responsiveness, header, social links, entry style/columns, ad spots, etc), plenty of post formats (standard, image, gallery, video, audio and quote), custom logo upload, built-in footer & sidebar ads and social link options (header and widget). Mesa is a quick and simple way to have your blog up and running!

10. Olsen

Olsen Light Free Blog WordPress Theme

Olsen Light is a lovely free blog WordPress theme you can use to start your own blog. While there is a premium version (which we highly recommend upgrading to), Olsen light has helpful features for integrating your social media, displaying an Instagram photo slider, uploading a logo, configuring your menu, and more options in the live Customizer. The theme also comes with blog-specific widgets for an “About Me” section, latest posts and social media. The Olsen theme is also compatible with the Elementor, Divi and/or SiteOrigin builders for even more powerful page building options.

11. Hemlock

Hemlock Responsive WordPress Blog  Theme

Hemlock is a stunning theme for aspiring bloggers. The theme has a unique featured posts homepage slider design to help you better showcase your best content. The theme includes all the features we mentioned that the best WordPress blogging themes should have – like built-in social sharing, plenty of post formats and solid layouts (choose from full-width, sidebar or grid blog). Plus the simple design makes it adaptable for any industry such as  fashion, tech, business, gardening, etc.

12. Amadeus Pro

Amadeus Pro WordPress Blogging Theme

The Amadeus blog WordPress theme is a great choice whether you want to blog as a hobby or to help promote your business. With Amadeus it’s easy to customize the look and feel of your website using the options for unlimited colors, logo, social and layout (all in the handy Theme Options Panel). Add a homepage slider, take advantage of the customizable sidebar widgets and choose your homepage layout (grid or columns) to create your own one of a kind blog.

13. New York (Blog & Shop)

New York WordPress Blog & Shop Theme

For those looking to build a blog as a business, New York is one of the best shop & blog WordPress themes you can choose. It’s the perfect theme to build an elegant blog to share your thoughts and tips, or to start your own online store with WooCommerce. The theme includes a unique homepage posts carousel, styled widgets (social, about, Instagram, recent posts, etc), two menu areas, a built-in footer Instagram feed grid and customizable copyright text. On top of the amazing blog features, the theme also comes with the powerful Yellow Pencil CSS editor plugin so you can tweak any part of the design with just a few clicks!

14. Essence Pro

Essence Pro Blog WordPress Theme

Essence Pro is a beautiful blogging child theme for the popular Genesis framework. Because it’s built on Genesis, the theme already includes important options for accessibility, custom header, responsiveness, translations, layout options, eCommerce and core page layouts. But what makes Essence Pro unique is the stylish homepage layout with featured image, newsletter optin and layered post grid design.

15. Ink Story

Ink Story Telling Blogging WordPress Theme

The Ink WordPress blog theme makes it easy to share your content. Design options for the theme are all neatly tucked into the live Customizer, where you can make changes to colors and fonts then see them live before you save. The theme’s stunning image grid homepage helps new posts standout, and since the theme is retina ready you can upload bigger, bolder photos.

16. Veggie

Veggie Blogging WordPress Theme

The Veggie Food Blog theme is a beautiful choice to start your own site with blog posts, recipes, video guides or anything else. This responsive blogging theme was created for food bloggers but would work great for any number of blog focuses. Easy customization options for colors, various layouts, page builder support (works great with Elementor, Beaver Builder or SiteOrigin), translation options, RTL compatibility and more all make Veggie a solid theme.

17. Authentic.

Authentic Lifestyle Blog WordPress Theme

The Authentic Lifestyle Blog theme includes 9 different demo designs to choose from to start your blog fast and easy. Pick your favorite with options for blog grid, sliders, styled overlays and more. The theme also has easy optins built-in to customize colors for over 67 theme aspects, header design options (with different menu, logo and social positions), customizable footer modules (add your logo, insert your Instagram, or use widgets), add video backgrounds, create a featured posts carousel and more.

18. Pineapple (Free)

Pineapple Free Tumblog WordPress Theme

Pineapple is a clean and simple tumblog style WordPress blogging theme. If you want to start a blog with just your social links and your content it really is the perfect theme. Pineapple features a clean centered layout, easy post formats (image, video, audio, quote), colorful category tags and built-in social media integration. The theme is also compatible with Yoast SEO (for breadcrumbs), Contact Form 7 and most other popular free WordPress plugins.

19. Peak

Peak Masonry Grid Blog WordPress Theme

The Peak theme is a grid based theme perfect for any online blog or magazine. The theme comes with 2 different homepage options for auto (masonry) or custom (you define image sizes) tiles, post drop cap (on first letter), multiple single post layouts and post formats, a built-in portfolio, mega menu option and even custom page title banners. The Peak theme is also compatible with the WooCommerce plugin – so you can add your own store or share affiliate goods with your readers.

20. TheBlogger

TheBlogger WordPress Blogging Theme

When considering the best blog WordPress themes we had to include TheBlogger of course. This blogging theme was designed to make (you guessed it) blogging easy. With intuitive Customizer options, built-in portfolio options, parallax backgrounds, intro background video, WooCommerce compatibility, color option, and unique layouts there’s lots to love about this WordPress blog theme.

21. Brittany

Brittany Light Free Blog WordPress Theme

Brittany Light is a traditional blog style layout with left side, single column content and a right hand side bar. But that is exactly what makes this theme great! It has options for custom widgets to add your social media links, newsletter signup, about me section and Instagram feed. The light version of the theme is a perfectly good theme to get your blog started. But if you want more features (like author box, color options, layouts, etc) we recommend upgrading to pro.

22. Let’s Blog

Let's Blog WordPress Theme

The Let’s Blog WordPress makes blogging a breeze. With one click demo import, 300+ theme Customizer settings and options, multiple blog layouts (with sliders, header images, carousels, grids, etc), galleries, custom sidebar widgets and an instant search there are a ton of great features within Let’s Blog so you can create a design worthy of your content.

23. Underwood

Underwood Story Blog WordPress Theme

If you’re looking for a good theme to create a personal blog, you can’t go wrong with the Underwood theme. This modern theme features bold typography, tons of post formats (9 in total for images, audio clips, video, galleries, etc), 3 unique homepage layout styles, WooCommerce support, styled Contact Form 7 fields and integrated social media.

24. Modern Studio Pro

Modern Studio Pro Blog WordPress Theme

Modern Studio Pro is another Genesis child theme. This means you have all of the same great features you’ve come to love about Genesis, with the added bonuses of some classy styling. This includes custom headers, backgrounds, color styles, page layouts, cusomtizer options, etc. Plus the theme adds 2 homepage widget areas and a lovely centered logo header style.

25. Recipes

Recipes Blogging WordPress Theme

Recipes is a stylish blogging premium WordPress theme perfect for sharing your favorite recipes with the world. This is a great theme for a restaurant blog, sharing vegan versions of your favorite recipes, blogging about copycat recipes or for any other food blog.

Cooking can involve a lot of trial and error, so why not share your delicious discoveries with the world? Recipes is a fantastic food blogging theme that you can use to publish and share your own tried and true recipes. The recipe custom post type makes it easy to add all the info your readers will need – including prep time, cooking time, ingredients and more.

Once you’ve added your awesome recipes, the theme includes options for your readers to rate your recipe. The theme also features sortable recipes pages, clickable ingredients lists, a “Print Recipe” option, and recipe author bios (great if you have multiple contributors to your food blog).

This theme is also translation ready, includes custom widgets for top rated and most recent recipes, built-in theme options, and it comes bundled with a child theme ready for your customizations.

Next Step: Choose One of the Best Blog WordPress Themes & Get Started!

With all of these awesome themes there are only two things left for you to do – pick one and start your blog!

We know there are a LOT of WordPress themes for blogging, but it’s important to choose a theme that’s right for you. Find a WordPress blog theme with solid code, good features and a layout you like. We’ve listed what (in our opinion) are some of the best blog WordPress themes. Hopefully there were a couple solid options for your blog in our roundup.

Then, get to work creating your content. If you’re not sure where to begin, try our easy 5-step guide to start a blog. We layout all the key parts to start your own blog with WordPress (trust us – it’s easy).

Have any questions about the themes listed above? Or do you have a theme we missed that you think should be on our list of the best blog WordPress themes? Leave a comment below!